Category Archives: James Lee Burke

You Lift Up My Spirits*

SDaliIt’s said that everyone has a talent. And there’s nothing quite like a job where one gets to use one’s natural ability. But there are some people who are truly gifted at something. It may be music, dancing, sport, acting, art or something else. Whatever it is, those are the people with a ‘once in a lifetime’ gift. They can’t always explain exactly how they do what they do, but their skill is extraordinary. They’re out there in real life of course, and we certainly see them in crime fiction. Their gifts make them very special and sometimes, very vulnerable.

Agatha Christie mentions this kind of rare gift in a few of her stories. One, for instance, is Appointment With Death. In that novel, the Boynton family is taking a holiday in the Middle East, including a sightseeing trip to Petra. While they’re at Petra, family matriarch Mrs. Boynton suddenly dies of what seems to be a heart attack. That’s logical, given her age and bad health. But Colonel Carbury isn’t satisfied, and he asks Hercule Poirot to look into the matter. Poirot agrees and begins the investigation. It turns out that Carbury’s suspicions were all too correct: Mrs. Boynton died of digitalis poisoning. She was, as Poirot puts it, a ‘mental sadist’ who kept her family cowed, so there is no lack of suspects. In the end, Poirot finds out who really poisoned Mrs. Boynton and why. One of Mrs. Boynton’s children is seventeen-year-old Ginevra ‘Ginny,’ who is already mentally and emotionally fragile. But, she turns out to have a rare gift for the stage. I don’t think it’s spoiling the story to say that when that gift is discovered, we see what a great actress Ginny is. I know, I know, fans of Henrietta Savernake in The Hollow… 

Elizabeth George’s A Traitor to Memory introduces us to the Davies family. Twenty-eight-year-old Gideon Davies has a rare gift for the violin, and is now world-class. He’s expressed himself musically since he was a child, and can’t imagine life without his music. Then one frightening day, he finds that he can’t play a note. He immediately seeks psychological help to find out what’s blocking his playing. In the meantime, his mother Eugenie is killed one night by what seems at first to be an accidental hit-and-run incident. But as Inspector Lynley and Sergeant Havers find, there’s nothing at all accidental about it. The deeper they look into the case, the more they learn about how dysfunctional the Davies family is. They also learn about the tragic death by drowning of Gideon’s younger sister twenty years earlier. It turns out, as you can imagine, that that incident is related both to Eugenie Davies’ death and to her son’s struggle with his music.

In James Lee Burke’s Jolie Blon’s Bounce, we meet gifted musician Tee Bobby Hulin. Here’s what Burke says about his talent:

 

‘…Tee Bobby possessed another, more serious gift, one he seemed totally undeserving of, as though the finger of God had pointed at him arbitrarily one day and bestowed on him a musical talent that was like none since the sad, lyrical beauty in the recordings of Guitar Slim.’

 

Hulin may be extraordinarily gifted, but that doesn’t prevent him being suspected in two vicious rape/murder cases. New Iberia, Louisiana police detective Dave Robicheaux doesn’t care much for Hulin as a person, but that doesn’t mean he thinks the man’s guilty of horrible crimes. And there are other suspects in these crimes. Robicheaux finds that in order to discover who the killer in this novel is, he will have to face some demons from his own past.

In Christopher Fowler’s Full Dark House, we learn of the first case investigated by Arthur Bryant and John May of London’s Peculiar Crimes Unit (PCU). In that case, the Palace Theatre’s upcoming production of Orpheus was sabotaged by several tragedies. One was the murder of gifted dancer Tanya Capistrania, who was to have had a solo part. In fact, she was leaving a rehearsal session when she was killed. She was so talented that one possible motive for her death was professional jealousy. The PCU found out who was responsible for the tragedies, including this murder, but there was one major thing left undone. Now, years later, it comes back to haunt John May when a bomb explodes in the PCU offices.  As May works to find out the truth about that bombing, he finds out that it’s directly related to that long-ago case.

The main protagonist in Gail Bowen’s series is political scientist and academic Joanne Kilbourn Shreve. The series follows her home life as much as it does the mysteries she investigates, so over the course of the novels, readers get to know her family. One member is her adopted daughter Taylor. Taylor is a truly gifted artist, who is trying to come to terms with some difficult issues in her life. At the same time, she is learning what it means to have her kind of talent. In The Gifted, we learn that two of Taylor’s pieces of art will be included in a benefit art auction. Her parents are deeply concerned about how this might affect Taylor. She is, after all, only fourteen, and they want her to have as safe and ‘normal’ (whatever that means) a childhood as possible. On the other hand, Taylor’s talent is undeniable, and she is passionate about her art. To deny her the opportunity to evolve as an artist would be like removing a limb. So despite some misgivings, Taylor’s permitted to contribute to the auction. One of her pieces has unintended and tragic consequences, and throughout the novel, we see how much a part of Taylor’s life her art really is.

And that’s the thing about people who have rare talents. Those gifts are integral and essential. Perhaps those with special gifts can’t explain exactly how they do what they do. But they couldn’t imagine not using them. Which gifted characters have made an impression on you?

 

On Another Note…

grammys-paul-mccartney-gi

This post is dedicated to one of the world’s truly gifted musical artists Paul McCartney. Happy Birthday, Sir Paul!

 

ps  The ‘photo above is by Salvador Dalí, who also had rare and special talent.

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Paul McCartney’s Follow Me.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Christopher Fowler, Elizabeth George, Gail Bowen, James Lee Burke

All the Sounds of Long Ago Will be Forever in My Head*

SoldiersToday (or tomorrow, depending on when you read this) the US observes Memorial Day, a day to remember those who gave their lives in the service of their country. And that’s as it should be. We owe a debt of gratitude to them and to their families that cannot be repaid.

The casualties of war though are not just physical. The experience of war leaves deep and lasting, sometimes permanent, psychological scars. Sometimes those scars are accompanied by more physical scars; sometimes they aren’t. Either way, though, those soldiers who do make it home alive don’t always leave the war behind. Certainly that’s true in real life, and we see it in crime fiction too.

In Chris Wormersley’s Bereft, Quinn Walker returns to his home in Flint, New South Wales after serving in the Somme during WWI. He’s been physically and emotionally scarred by the Great War. But instead of the rest and peace he needs, he finds that Flint is caught up in the terrible influenza pandemic that followed the Great War. What’s more, many people, including Walker’s own father, believe that he is responsible for the death of his sister, which occurred ten years earlier. Walker knows that he’s not welcome in the family home, so he hides out in an abandoned shack. That’s how he meets ten-year-old Sadie Fox, who’s hiding there herself. With her help, Walker gets past his war scars enough to find the courage to let his mother know he’s alive and to piece together what really happened to his sister.

Jacqueline Winspear and the mother/son writing team of ‘Charles Todd’ both explore the issue of PTSD in their novels. Winspear’s Maisie Dobbs was a nurse during WWI, and as the 1920’s begin, she has to cope with the physical and mental scars the war left. She also has to learn to deal with other people’s scars. In fact, the theme of returning soldiers trying to fit back into society is quite strong in that series. Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge series features a police detective who took time away from his job to fight during WWI. He’s returned a different person though, and deals with several psychological issues. One of the themes addressed in this series is what people call ‘survivor’s guilt,’ as well as the issue of coping with the fact that one’s had to kill.

Geoffrey McGeachin explores what we now call PTSD in his Charlie Berlin series, beginning with The Diggers Rest Hotel, which takes place in 1947. Berlin served in Europe, and although he’s come home from the war physically intact, he has several psychic and emotional scars. McGeachin shows how Berlin has to cope with flashbacks and nightmares, as well as with the grim reality that many of his comrades didn’t make it home at all. As time goes on, Berlin does what many former soldiers have done. He gets on with his life as best he can, he tries to start living again and he does what he needs to do. But that doesn’t mean PTSD isn’t part of his life.

It’s also a part of life for James Lee Burke’s Dave Robicheaux. Robicheaux is a veteran of the Vietnam War. In several of the novels that feature him, he deals with flashbacks and nightmares from that time. And he has a sort of bond with others who also face the same demons. He doesn’t always cope successfully with the psychological challenges he faces, and his life as a cop doesn’t make it any easier. But he does his best to make a life for himself and his family.

Michael Palmer’s The Last Surgeon features Dr. Nick Gerrity, who suffers from PTSD after an act of terrorism during his service in Afghanistan. When he returns to the US, he does his best to start life again. He works with the Helping Hands Mobile Medical Unit to assist wounded veterans and to provide medical service to Washington’s street people. Then a nurse, Belle Coates, is murdered by someone who tries to make the death look like suicide. Belle’s sister Jillian doesn’t believe that though, and works to find out who killed Belle and why. Very few people believe her until her own home is firebombed. The trail leads to a connection between Belle and Nick Gerrity, and he and Jillian work to learn the truth about Belle’s death.

And then there’s Robert Crais’ Suspect, a standalone that features LAPD police officer Scott James. James has PTSD as a result of an attack that left him wounded and his police partner Stephanie Anders dead. Once James heals physically, he’s moved to the LAPD’s K-9 unit.  There he is paired with Maggie, a German Shepherd with her own case of PTSD after the loss of her handler during service with a US Marine Corps unit. James is determined to find out who killed Anders, and he and Maggie begin the investigation. But this is a much more complicated and dangerous case than it seems, and James and Maggie will have to depend on each other and trust each other if they’re going to solve it.

As you can see just from these examples, PTSD is a very real part of life for those who’ve seen military service, and I’ve only offered a few instances here. There are many more. It just goes to show that not all casualties of war are those who die in battle. But I hope these examples also show that those who come back from war with PTSD are humans, capable of growth, of healing and of a meaningful life.

Part of our debt of gratitude to those who gave their lives in military service includes, I think, our debt to those who came back and who need our support. They don’t want our pity. They want and richly deserve the psychological and other support they need as they work to put their lives back together. There are lots of ways in which we can help provide that support too. Volunteering, donations and so on are just a few examples. I’ll bet you can think of more. Whatever you come up with, it’s the least we can do for people who’ve laid their lives on the line for us.

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Charlie Daniels’ Still in Saigon.

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Filed under Charles Todd, Chris Womersley, Geoffrey McGeachin, Jacqueline Winspear, James Lee Burke, Michael Palmer, Robert Crais

With a Little Love We Can Lay it Down*

Blended FamiliesToday, the concept of ‘family’ extends far beyond the stereotypical ‘Mum, Dad and kids.’ There are adoptive families, foster families, step-families and a lot more. It makes sense that that diversity in real life would also come up in crime fiction, and we certainly see a lot of it. Space doesn’t permit me to mention all of the examples out there, but here are a few.

Agatha Christie mentions blended families several times in her stories. I’ll give just one example. In Evil Under the Sun, Hercule Poirot is taking a holiday at the Jolly Roger Hotel on Leathercombe Bay. Among his fellow guests are famous actress Arlena Stuart Marshall, her husband Captain Kenneth Marshall and her step-daughter Linda. This particular blend is not a happy one. Linda dislikes Arlena, who in turn pays very little attention to her step-daughter. And the Marshalls’ marriage is shaky, a situation which doesn’t improve when Arlena begins a not-very-well-hidden affair with another hotel guest Patrick Redfern. One day Arlena is strangled on a beach not far from the hotel. Since Poirot is at the same hotel, he works with the police to find out who the murderer is. As you can imagine, both Marshall and his daughter fall under suspicion, and it’s interesting to see how the family dynamic plays out as the book ends.

Karin Fossum’s Don’t Look Back is the story of the murder of fifteen-year-old Annie Holland, whose body is found by a tarn not far from the village where she lives. Inspector Konrad Sejer and his assistant Jacob Skarre investigate, and of course they begin at home, so to speak. Annie’s parents Ada and Eddie are devastated by her death. Her half-sister Sølvi is upset too, but she’s an adult, more or less on her own now, and she and Annie were never very close. And then there’s Ada’s first husband Axel Bjørk, Sølvi’s father. He and Ada had a bitter break-up and he has a lot of resentment against her. The blended family of Ada, Eddie, Sølvi and Annie hasn’t been as tightly knit as it may seem on the surface. There are other possibilities though as to who killed Annie. So Sejer and Skarre continue to dig into the case. As the novel unfolds, we see how the blended nature of this family has affected the characters, and how Annie’s murder affects them as well.

Anthony Bidulka’s Saskatoon PI Russell Quant isn’t what you’d call a family man. But in Sundowner Ubuntu, he meets Ethan Ash, who runs Ash House, a retirement home. Ash is the single father of Simonette, who usually goes by the name Simon. Quant and Ash begin a relationship in Aloha Candy Hearts, and we see how these three people work to put together a loving family life.

There are other sleuths too who have blended families. For example, fans of James Lee Burke’s Dave Robicheaux will know that he is the adoptive father of Alafair, whom he rescued from a plane crash that killed her biological mother. In A Morning For Flamingos, Robicheaux is reunited with his high school sweetheart Bootsie Mouton Giacano. The two resume their relationship over the course of the stories, and they marry and build a family with Alafair. There are many stresses and strains on the family, including the dangers of Robicheaux’s job, his wife’s health problems, and the fact that Robicheaux strays more than once. But they all care deeply about each other and their family dynamic is an important part of this series.

Gail Bowen’s Joanne Kilbourn Shreve is also part of a blended family. In Deadly Appearances, the first novel in this series, we learn that Kilbourn’s first husband Ian was murdered when he stopped to help two young people who were having car trouble. For a time Kilbourn raises her three children Mieka, Peter and Angus on her own. She also takes in Taylor, whose mother, one of Kilbourn’s former friends, has been murdered. Later in the series Kilbourn marries attorney Zack Shreve. By this time, the three older children are more or less on their own, although they are still very much a part of their mother’s life. So the day-to-day family life mostly consists of Joanne, Zack and Taylor, and it’s not always an easy dynamic. Taylor is a supremely gifted artist, but she has her own issues to deal with. And both Joanne and Zack are intelligent, strong-willed people who don’t always agree. But they do love each other and they work hard to keep their family solid. Here’s how Joanne puts it in The Nesting Dolls:

 

‘Ours was not an easy marriage, but it was a good one.’

 

And Taylor benefits from this blended family too.

Fans of Alexander McCall Smith’s No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series will know that Mma. Precious Ramotswe has helped to create a successful blended family. In Tears of the Giraffe, Mma. Ramotswe learns that her fiancé Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni has taken in two orphans, Motholeli and her younger brother Puso. He didn’t exactly consult her about the matter either, and it makes for awkwardness between them. But Mma. Ramotswe and her fiancé love each other and what’s more, they care very much for the children and learn to love them too. As the series goes on, they form a solid family unit even though there are stresses and strains at times.

And then there’s Timothy Hallinan’s Philip ‘Poke’ Rafferty. He’s a writer whose specialty has been adventure travel guides. But he also has a knack for finding people who don’t want to be found, and for solving problems. Rafferty lives in Bangkok and has grown to love the place. Mostly though, he loves the family he’s cobbled together there. His wife Rose is a former bar girl/prostitute who’s left the business to start her own cleaning company.  He’s also working to formally adopt Miaow, a former street child he’s taken in. Each of the three of them has a past to cope with, and plenty of personal scars. But they love and care about each other, and they work very hard to be a family.

And that’s the thing about blended families. It can take extra work to forge a real set of bonds in those situations. But blended families can be a tremendous source of love and support. And let’s face it: stereotypical family life isn’t always easy or successful either. Which crime-fictional blended families stand out in your memory?

 

 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Paul McCartney’s With a Little Luck.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Alexander McCall Smith, Anthony Bidulka, Gail Bowen, James Lee Burke, Karin Fossum, Timothy Hallinan

On a Long, Lonesome Highway*

Deserted RoadsIf you’ve ever taken a long drive, you know how empty and lonesome a road can be. There are certain stretches of road where it’s very unwise to drive unless you have a car that’s in dependable shape, and plenty of fuel. But even those things don’t always keep a person out of trouble when the road is long and fairly empty. That sort of setting is tailor-made for a crime fiction story for obvious reasons. So it’s little wonder we see it an awful lot. Here are just a few examples; I’m sure you’ll be able to come up with a lot more.

In Agatha Christie’s The Kidnapped Prime Minister, Hercule Poirot gets a visit one evening from the Leader of the House of Commons and a member of the War Cabinet. Prime Minister David MacAdam has apparently been kidnapped while en route to Paris for an important speech he was scheduled to make. World War II is in the offing and MacAdam had planned a ‘rally the troops’ speech. But there are many important people who want to bring down MacAdam’s government and move England in the direction of appeasement. So this particular speech is of critical importance. Poirot and Captain Hastings are given one day to find MacAdam and catch his kidnappers, since the speech is supposed to take place the next evening. They get started immediately and in the end, they find out what has happened to the prime minister. They discover that a certain stretch of lonely road played an important part in the story’s events.

In James Lee Burke’s A Morning For Flamingos, New Iberia, Louisiana cop Dave Robicheaux and his partner Lester Benoit are assigned to transport Jimmie Lee Boggs and Tee Beau Latiolais to Louisiana’s state prison at Angola. Both men have been convicted of murder, but Tee Beau’s grandmother Tante Lemon claims that he’s innocent. She says he was with her at the time of the murder for which he’s been convicted, but that no-one will listen to her. She’s asked Robicheaux to help her clear Tee Beau’s name, but Robicheaux doesn’t think there’s much he can do about it. He does get drawn into the case though. While he, Benoit and their two prisoners are en route to Angola, Boggs and Tee Beau escape, leaving Benoit dead and Robicheaux badly injured. Here’s how Burke describes the place where the escape happens:

 

‘The rain struck my face, and I rolled the window up again. I could see cows clumped together among the trees, a solitary, dark farmhouse set back in a sugarcane field, and up ahead an old filling station that had been there since the 1930s. The outside bay was lighted, and the rain was blowing off the eaves into the light.’

 

Not a place where one wants to be injured. Still, Robicheaux survives. He gets his chance to go after Jimmie Lee Boggs, too. An old friend Minos Dautrieve, who’s now with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) asks Robicheaux to go undercover to bring down New Orleans crime boss Tony Cardo. Robicheaux isn’t willing to do the job until he finds out that Boggs has been working with Cardo. When he learns that, Robicheaux sees his chance to get Boggs.

In Gail Bowen’s Deadly Appearances we meet political scientist and academic Joanne Kilbourn. In this, the first in this series, we learn that Kilbourn is mourning the loss of her husband Ian, who was murdered one night on the way back from a colleague’s funeral. Both Deadly Appearances and A Colder Kind of Death tell the story of how Ian Kilbourn was returning to Regina when he stopped to help a young couple, Kevin Tarpley and Maureen Gault, who were having car trouble.  They were on a lonely stretch of road, apparently on their way to a party, when their car gave up the ghost. When Kilbourn refused to take them to the party, Tarpley killed him. That murder has several consequences beyond the obvious grief that it cases the Kilbourn family. The story arc concerning Ian Kilbourn’s murder plays an important role in a few of the novels in this series, and it adds to the interest.

Catherine O’Flynn’s The News Where You Are introduces readers to TV presenter Phil Smedway, who worked for a regional series until he ‘hit it big’ and went national. Then one day he was tragically killed in a hit-and-run incident while he was jogging on a more or less deserted stretch of road. His successor Frank Allcroft (whom Smedway also mentored) feels drawn to the place where the accident occurred. Oddly enough, it’s a straight length of road, so even an impaired driver would have been able to see Smedway and swerve to avoid him. What’s more the weather was dry and clear at the time of Smedway’s death. So Allcroft can’t see how this could have been an accident. He decides to find out what really happened to Smedway and in the process, finds out some unexpected things about his mentor.

And then there’s Helen Fitzgerald’s The Cry. Joanna Lindsay and Alistair Robertson have just arrived in Melbourne from Scotland with their nine-week-old son Noah. Then they face every parent’s worst nightmare: the loss of their son. Immediately the Australian media begins to make much of the story, and a massive search is undertaken. But there is no sign of Noah. Gradually some questions come up about, especially, Joanna. Did she or Alistair have something to do with Noah’s disappearance? Gradually, and through a few people’s points of view, we learn what happened to Noah. One of the places that play a role in the story is a lonely stretch of road on the Tullamarine Freeway that links Melbourne to the airport. Here’s how Fitzgerald describes it:

 

‘Were there really no towns or buildings in sight? Just the straight road behind them and the straight road ahead with black, ominous sky looming over its horizon?’

 

As this is Joanna’s first trip to Australia, it’s not exactly a warmly welcoming bit of scenery…

Of course, you never do know what’s going to happen on a long stretch of road. That’s what bank manager Martin Carter finds out in Geoffrey McGeachin’s Fat, Fifty and F***ed!  Carter finds out that he’s being retrenched, and it doesn’t help matters that his marriage is ending too. On his last day at the bank, he can’t resist the chance to get his hands on a million-dollar payroll and start all over. With the aid of a stolen police 4WD, Carter takes off. His plan is to meet up with an old friend, but the trip certainly doesn’t go as planned. Along the road he meets up with a librarian who’s got her own problems, a group of New Age bikers, and lots more interesting sorts of people. It’s certainly not a peaceful drive through the country.

As I say, you never do know what’s going to happen on a long, deserted stretch of road. Perhaps best keep the windows closed and don’t stop. For anything. ;-)

 

 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Bob Seger’s Turn the Page

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Catherine O'Flynn, Gail Bowen, Geoffrey McGeachin, Helen Fitzgerald, James Lee Burke

I’ve Found a Paradise That’s Trouble Proof*

RetreatsLet’s face it: life gets a bit much sometimes. When that happens, it’s nice to have a sort of retreat – a special place to go to get away from it all. An interesting post from author and fellow blogger D.S. Nelson has got me thinking about how many fictional characters have those kinds of special places. Pop culture fans will know for instance that Superman has his famous Fortress of Solitude. And if you look at crime fiction, you see that there are plenty of characters who have special retreats like that. Here are just a few examples.

In Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, we meet James Sheppard, doctor for the village of King’s Abbot. Even in a peaceful village, life can get busy, especially for a doctor, so Sheppard has a special retreat in his house. He’s built a workroom where even the maid

 

‘…is not allowed to wreak havoc with a dustpan and brush.’

 

Sheppard gets drawn into a case of murder when his friend, retired manufacturing tycoon Roger Ackroyd, is stabbed in his study one evening. The prime suspect is Ackroyd’s stepson Captain Ralph Paton. Paton’s fiancée Flora Ackroyd is convinced that he’s innocent, so she asks Hercule Poirot to investigate. Poirot is impressed with Flora’s sense of conviction so he agrees to look into the matter. In the end, Poirot finds that Ackroyd knew more than was safe for him to know about one particular villager.

Scott Young’s Murder in a Cold Climate is the story of the shooting murder of Native activist Morton Cavendish. Matthew ‘Matteesie’ Kitologitak of the RCMP is a witness to the killing, and happened to know Cavendish anyway. So he’s determined to find the killer. He’s even more fixed on the investigation when it turns out that Cavendish’s death could be related to another case Matteesie’s working on: the disappearance of a Cessna with three men aboard. One of the people of interest in this case is Cavendish’s son William. William may or may not be involved in either or both incidents. But it’s likely that he has a lot of information no matter how innocent he may be. So Matteesie wants to find him. It turns out that William has a special place – a retreat he’s had since adolescence – where he goes sometimes just to be by himself. That retreat turns out to play a key role in the story.

In Gail Bowen’s Deadly Appearances, political scientist and academic Joanne Kilbourn is shocked and in grief when her friend Androu ‘Andy’ Boychuk is poisoned during a political speech at a community picnic. It’s bad enough that Boychuk was a friend, but what makes things worse is that this brings back the murder of Kilbourn’s husband Ian, whose loss she still mourns. As a way of dealing with her loss, Kilbourn decides to write a biography of Boychuck. As she gathers material for her book, Kilbourn also finds herself investigating the murder. As it turns out, Boychuk’s death had nothing really do to with his political views, and everything to do with his past. Kilbourn’s home has a ‘granny flat’ above the garage, and she uses that both as an office and as a retreat. She spends her share of time in the granny flat and in this book, that fact plays an important role in what happens.

Virginia Duigan’s The Precipice introduces us to retired school principal Thea Farmer. She bought what she intended as a retreat in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, and was planning it as her dream home. She’s not much of a one for people, and what she wants most of all is to be away from as many of them as possible. But financial issues and poor decisions mean that she has to give up her dream home and settle for the house next door, a house she calls ‘the hovel.’ To add insult to injury, Thea’s perfect retreat is soon purchased by Frank Campbell and Ellice Carrington. Thea refers to these new neighbours as ‘the invaders;’ not only have they purchased the home she considers her own, but they have also taken away her sense of retreat and privacy. Despite her intentions to have nothing to do with ‘the invaders,’ Thea finds herself getting involved in their lives when Frank’s niece Kim moves in. Thea reluctantly warms up to Kim and sees that she has real promise as a writer. So when she comes to believe that Frank and Ellice are not providing an appropriate home for Kim, Thea decides to do something about it. Special places and retreats play an important part in this story.

Many other sleuths also have retreats and special places they go when they want to get away. Fans of Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe will know that he spends his share of time in his orchid room. And everyone in his life knows better than to disturb him when he’s communing with his plants. He does love the orchids, but he also uses to the time to get away.

James Lee Burke’s Dave Robicheaux has his share of difficult times and trauma, both because of his personal life and because of his job as a New Iberia, Louisiana cop. He gets away from it all by taking his boat out and going fishing. It’s his escape – his special place.

And then there’s Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapman. She has her home and bakery in a large Melbourne building called Insula. Although she doesn’t go looking for mysteries to solve, they seem to find her. And even when they don’t, she’s kept quite busy with her business, her relationship with her lover Daniel Cohen, and her duties as servant to three cats. So sometimes Chapman likes to get away and relax. When she does, she doesn’t have far to go. Insula has a lovely rooftop garden where Chapman takes a glass of wine or a drink and enjoys the view. The rooftop is also the scene of some terrific get-togethers of the building’s residents.

And of course, there’s D.S. Nelson’s own Blake Heatherington. As the series featuring him begins, he’s a milliner whose family has been in the business for a long time. He understands hats and the kinds of personalities that are best suited for different kinds of hats. You might say that hat-making is in his blood. So even when he’s no longer involved in the day-to-day business of millinery, Heatherington enjoys creating hats. And he’s got a special retreat for just that purpose. He goes there to try new creations, to think over his cases and to be alone with his thoughts.

Do you have a special sort of retreat like that? If you’re a writer, does your protagonist?

Thanks, D.S., for the inspiration! Folks, now that you’ve been kind enough to stop here, please consider making your next stop D.S. Nelson’s terrific site. It’s got good conversation about writing and some terrific collaborative short stories, among lots of other great things.

 

 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Gerry Goffin and Carole King’s Up On the Roof, made popular by the Drifters.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, D.S. Nelson, Gail Bowen, James Lee Burke, Kerry Greenwood, Rex Stout, Scott Young, Virginia Duigan