Category Archives: Michael Connelly

It’s The Colorado Rocky Mountain High*

DenverIt’s called the Mile High City, among other things, because of its location above sea level. It’s full of history, beautiful scenery, sport and some excellent food and locally brewed beer. Oh, and there are great people too. Yes, I’m talking about Denver. Originally, Denver was a mining town during the Pike’s Peak gold rush of the mid-1850s (hence the name of Denver’s basketball team, the Nuggets). But it’s much more than that. Colorado is also the home of several Native American Nations, including the Arapaho and the Ute. And there’s a heavy influence from the state’s ranching history too. All of this makes Denver a really interesting Western US city located in one of the country’s most breathtaking places, the US Rocky Mountains.

Denver can also be dangerous. What? You don’t believe me? Well it is. It’s the setting for some fine crime fiction. I only have space for a few examples here, but they ought to serve to give you a sense of what I mean.

Michael Connelly’s The Poet features reporter Jack McEvoy of the Rocky Mountain News. As a crime reporter, he’s seen his share of death in all of its ugly forms. But then he learns that his twin brother Sean, a cop with the Denver Police Department, has committed suicide. McEvoy didn’t even know his brother was that fragile mentally, but it’s not so surprising considering the last case Sean was working on before his death: the very brutal murder of university student Theresa Lofton. The case generated a lot of publicity and has been very difficult for all of the police involved, especially since they haven’t been able to solve it. But there are little clues, including a message that Sean left behind, that suggest his death was not suicide. So his brother looks into the case more deeply and finds that a dangerous killer has been at work.

Stephen White’s psychological thriller series ‘stars’ Dr. Alan Gregory. Gregory is a clinical psychologist based in Boulder, Colorado, which is about 30 miles/48 km from Denver. His partner, later his wife, is Deputy District Attorney Lauren Crowder. The twenty-book series is mostly based in the Denver/Boulder area, but occasionally Gregory travels in the course of his work. Many of the plots have to do with Gregory’s clients, although some are related to his wife’s work. Some are also connected with his past. For instance, Manner of Death begins with the death of a former colleague Arnie Dresser. When Gregory is asked to help find out whether Dresser was murdered, he discovers that someone seems to be targeting the group of people who were in his own psychiatry preparation program. Now he’ll have to work with another former colleague Dr. Sawyer Sackett to find out who the killer is.

C.J. Box is perhaps best known for his Joe Pickett series, which takes place in Wyoming. But his standalone Three Weeks to Say Goodbye is set in Denver. Jack McGuane and his wife Melissa are the loving parents of beautiful baby Angelina. Everything changes though when it comes out that Angelina’s biological father Garrett Moreland never relinquished his parental rights. Now he wants to exercise them. As you can imagine, the McGuanes refuse to give up their daughter. When Garrett’s powerful father Judge John Moreland hears of this, he and Garrett visit the McGuanes to try to persuade them, and then bribe them, to change their minds. They refuse again and Moreland strikes back. He issues a court order directing them to surrender Angelina to the court within twenty-one days. Now the McGuanes have a terrible choice. They decide to do whatever it takes to keep their daughter. And as the story goes on, we see what a terrible price ‘whatever it takes’ exacts.

Peg Brantley’s Red Tide is the story of Jamie Taylor, a Colorado bank loan professional who also volunteers as a rescue dog trainer. When a convicted killer tells the FBI where he buried his victims, Taylor and her dogs are sent to the scene to try to find the bodies. They’re successful, but they also make another eerie discovery: there are bodies there that this killer could not have buried. Now Taylor gets involved in the search for the person who used the same remote field as a burial ground. As an interesting note, the climactic scenes in this case take place near Denver’s Mile High Stadium during a US football game featuring the Denver Broncos.

Colorado is also the home of a very active and creative crime fiction community including Patricia Stoltey and Beth Groundwater, among many others. I encourage you to check out Patricia Stoltey’s terrific blog for all the latest in Colorado authors’ news (Psst….her novel Dead Wrong will be coming out soon!!). You can also visit the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers website and catch up on Colorado fiction.

So, in case you didn’t already know this, you can see that Denver may be gorgeous, but you may just want to look out….just to be sure…
 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from John Denver’s Rocky Mountain High.

30 Comments

Filed under Beth Groundwater, C.J. Box, Michael Connelly, Patricia Stoltey, Peg Brantley, Stephen White

It Could Make a Million For You Overnight*

BestSellersI’m sure you’ve seen them. There are plenty of mentions of them in bookshops, online and in other places too. That’s right; I’m talking about ‘blockbuster’ best-sellers. You know, those books that seem to catch on instantly and become really successful (and lucrative for the publisher and the author).

In a way, those best-sellers are very much a mixed blessing, as the saying goes. On the one hand, it can be very frustrating to be bombarded with hype about a best-seller that’s really only mediocre in quality. I know you don’t need any input from me to come up with a list of novels like that. I’ve got friends who refuse to buy anything billed as a ‘best-seller’ for just that reason.

Matters are not made any better by the fact that publishers want to cash in on best-sellers’ popularity, so they link other novels with the best-seller. You know the kind of thing: ‘If you loved __________, you’ll love______;’ or ‘_______ meets_________.’ Sometimes there are similarities between novels, but more often than not, it’s just hype. And that means it doesn’t really tell the reader much about the book.

Publishers cash in on best-sellers in another way too. Once a novel becomes extremely popular, there’s a lot of pressure for other authors to use the same formula. For example, I wonder how many authors were (or at least felt) pressured to write about serial killers after the incredible success of Thomas Harris’ Red Dragon and The Silence of the Lambs? What this can mean is that it’s harder for an author to write something different – something that’s not like the books at the top of best-seller lists.

It’s also harder for authors who aren’t – ahem – household words to get their names ‘out there.’ Publishers know they can bank on a best-seller, so for very logical reasons, they look for manuscripts from those authors or manuscripts that are similar to the work of those authors. In other words, ‘blockbuster’ best-sellers can ‘drown out’ the work of other authors.

So this means that best-sellers aren’t at all good for the genre, right? Wrong. Best-sellers can offer good things for the genre, too, at least as I see it. For one thing, a best-seller can encourage people who normally wouldn’t read crime fiction to try the genre. Just as one example, the work of Michael Connelly is just about always successful in terms of sales. There are other crime writers too whose work sells very well, and whose novels could potentially get more readers to try other crime fiction. And that’s a good thing for crime writers whose work might not otherwise be read.

There’s another interesting effect of the ‘blockbuster’ best seller too. It can call attention to a certain kind of novel, or novels from a certain country or region. This in turn can help other authors who write that sort of novel, or who are from that area. Here’s one concrete example. As you know, Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy caught on worldwide. All debates about the merit of those novels aside, something about them caught people’s attention. The film adaptations of these novels have gotten them even more attention. And that’s arguably meant that people who might not otherwise have tried Scandinavian crime fiction have chosen to do so.

There’ve been, of course, highly talented Scandinavian crime novelists for a long time – since long before the Larsson trilogy. I wonder how many readers might not have discovered the work of those novelists if it hadn’t been for best-seller authors such as Larsson and Jo Nesbø. Whether or not you’re fan of those particular authors’ work, It’s an interesting example of how a few best-sellers can build interest in crime fiction from a particular region.

A best-seller can also increase interest in a certain kind of novel. Just as one example, consider Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. That was published in 2012, and has since gone on to be an international best-seller. A film adaptation of it has come out, and, well, you know the rest. Since the release of that novel, there’s been a lot of interest in S.J. Watson’s Before I Go to Sleep, published the year before Gone Girl. And a lot of people argue that A.S.A. Harrison’s The Silent Wife, published a year later, has also benefited in terms of sales from the popularity of Gone Girl. If that’s true, then it’s possible that the ‘bandwagon’ effect can be positive for crime writers, at least in terms of interest in their work.

So is the ‘blockbuster’ effect a good one or not? It’s definitely frustrating at times. I get as tired as you do of inappropriate comparisons of books and authors. And I get as tired as you do of million-sellers that turn out to be mediocre at best, and sometimes not even that good.

On the other hand, if a major best-seller gets more people to try crime fiction, I say that can be good for the genre. If a major best-seller gets readers trying books from new-to-them countries or about new-to-them themes, that can be good for the genre too.

What do you think? Do you specifically avoid best-sellers? Does it depend on the author? If you’re a writer, do you pay attention to what’s selling well and think of it in terms of your own work?

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got to prepare for my appearance on all the major television shows to announce that next million-seller release. It could happen… ;-)

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from The Beatles’ Paperback Writer.

44 Comments

Filed under A.S.A. Harrison, Gillian Flynn, Jo Nesbø, Michael Connelly, S.J. Watson, Stieg Larsson, Thomas Harris

Imagine There’s No Countries*

GLobalismIt’s no secret that modern technology has dramatically increased the contact we have with people from, quite literally, all over the world. This globalisation has meant that more and more, we’re aware of and influenced by other cultures and ways of doing things. The global nature of communication certainly presents its share of challenges. Different cultures have of course different values, priorities and ways of looking at the world. So negotiating meaning can be a challenge. So can the personal preferences, biases and so on that we all have. There are other challenges too such as language differences. But the payoff can mean that some major issues that affect everyone can be addressed as a wealth of expertise and innovative perspectives can be brought to bear.

It can work in real life, and it does in crime fiction too. There are lots of crime fiction novels and series where the investigation crosses geopolitical borders, and even when there are challenges, the end result is often more productive than it would be without that kind of co-operation.

In Agatha Cristie’s Death in the Clouds, for example, Hercule Poirot is on a flight from Paris to London when a fellow passenger Marie Morisot suddenly dies of what turns out to be poison. The only possible suspects are the other passengers on the flight, so Poirot and Chief Inspector Japp sift through the various possibilities to find out who would have wanted to murder the victim. She was a well-known moneylender who did business as Madame Giselle, and more than one of the suspects might have had good reason to want her dead. Madame Giselle was French, so British and French authorities will have to work together to solve the case. And in this particular instance they do. There are a few moments of awkwardness, but in the main, the investigation is successful. And it’s clear that without that co-operation, it might very well not be. Fans of Christie’s work will know that The Murder on the Links presents a slightly different view of a joint effort between French and British police. And such ‘team efforts’ don’t always work smoothly. But when they work well, they lead to better investigation.

Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö’s Roseanna offers an interesting look at the way Swedish and American police work together to solve a case. When the body of a young woman is dredged up from Lake Vättern, it’s extremely difficult at first to find out who she is. But eventually she is identified as twenty-seven-year-old Roseanna McGraw, a native of the US state of Nebraska. She was touring Sweden when she was killed, and at first there seems no motive for the murder. Little by little though, we get a more detailed portrait of her personal life and of those who interacted with her. And that leads slowly to the killer. In the end, Beck and his team find out who the murderer is. But it would arguably have been impossible without the information provided by Detective Lieutenant Elmer Kafka of the Lincoln, Nebraska police. At the time the novel was written, this kind of global approach to crime solving involved cables, sometimes-unreliable international telephone calls and letters. It’s a lot easier with modern communication.

In Helene Tursten’s The Glass Devil, Göteborg police inspector Irene Huss and her team investigate the murder of schoolteacher Jacob Schyttelius and his parents. At first, the murders seem to be the work of a Satanist group. That’s not a far-fetched theory, as Schyttelius’ father is a member of the clergy. But it’s not long before that theory is disproved. Now the possibility arises that someone is killing the members of the family for more personal reasons. If that’s the case, then Schyttelius’ sister Rebecka could very well be the murderer’s next target. She lives in London, so Huss and her team will have to work with UK authorities to protect Rebecka Schyttelius and solve the case. Huss travels to London and works with Inspector Glen Thompson of the Met. Although Huss speaks English, Thompson’s knowledge of the local scene and his connections are essential to solving the case. Huss’ knowledge of the family background and of the murders themselves is just as important.

Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch deals with a global sort of a case in 9 Dragons. When Los Angeles liquor store owner John Li is shot, Bosch and his partner Ignacio Ferras investigate. Evidence suggests that Li was making protection payoffs to one of Los Angeles’ triads, or ‘protection groups’ with connections to Hong Kong. Bosch is starting to follow up that lead when he gets a call from his daughter Maddie, who’s living there with her mother (and Bosch’s ex-wife) Eleanor Wish. Maddie says that she’s been kidnapped, so Bosch immediately travels to Hong Kong to find her. In the end, we find out what happened to Maddie; we also find out the truth about John Li’s murder. And throughout the novel, we see how the global nature of today’s world impacts these cases.

Ian Hamilton’s Toronto-based sleuth Ava Lee is a forensic accountant. She works for a Hong Kong-based company whose specialty is recovering large debts. In The Water Rat of Wanchai, The Disciple of Las Vegas and The Wild Beasts of Wuhan, Lee travels to many different parts of the world as she traces lost money. This series takes a very global perspective on the way money is earned, stolen, managed, transferred and hidden. Because today’s technology allows transactions to be global, financial investigation has to be global as well.

Crime fiction also shows us globalism on a small scale too. For instance, Steve Hamilton’s Alex McKnight series takes place in and around Paradise, on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. That part of Michigan is of course very close to the border with the Canadian province of Ontario. So in several of McKnight’s stories, there’s a lot of communication and interaction between Canadian and American people, and that includes police authorities. As Hamilton shows, globalism has several facets. On the one hand, there are sometimes-subtle but distinct differences between the Canadian way of doing things and the American way. They’re different cultures. They see life differently and that’s portrayed in the series. And yet, we also see the easy communication, the overall willing co-operation, and the recognition that each side benefits from the other’s knowledge. What’s even more interesting (at least to me) is that that area of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan has its own unique culture, distilled from the Indigenous cultures, the Candian culture and the American culture. It’s a global way of looking at life at a very local level.

In today’s world, easy travel and even easier communication have arguably resulted in a more global perspective on life. Certainly crime has ‘gone global.’ So it makes a lot of sense that perspectives on investigation would do the same. I’ve only touched on a few examples here. So now, it’s over to the rest of you folks in the global crime fiction community…

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from John Lennon’s Imagine. He would have been 74 today as this is posted. Imagine…

26 Comments

Filed under Agatha Christie, Ian Hamilton, Irene Tursten, Maj Sjöwall, Michael Connelly, Per Wahlöö, Steve Hamilton

If Not For You*

Strong Secondary CharactersMany crime novels feature one or perhaps two main protagonists. The stories focus on those people, and in high quality novels, they’re well developed and interesting. But sometimes, one of the secondary characters is at least as interesting – maybe even more so. Sometimes it’s because that character has an air of mystery about her or him. Sometimes it’s because of that character’s strong or unusual kind of personality. Sometimes it’s for other reasons. Either way, those secondary characters may not have leading roles, but they still stand out in the memory. Here are just a few examples; I’m quite certain you can think of more than I could anyway.

One such character, Mr. Robinson, appears in several Christie stories, including Cat Among the Pigeons (in which Hercule Poirot ‘stars’), Postern of Fate (A Tommy and Tuppence Beresford Novel) and Passenger to Frankfurt (a standalone). We never learn a great deal about Mr. Robinson, and that adds to the mystery of his character. We do know that he’s financier who counts among his friends people in high and sensitive government positions. He also does business with all sorts of international clients as well. We know nearly nothing about his background, nor do we know exactly where he lives. He’s quite honest about his interest in the adventures he’s involved in: money. But at the same time, he’s not a cruelly greedy person. Here is how he describes himself and his fellow financiers in Cat Among the Pigeons,
 

‘It is a very old trade… And a lucrative one…We work in with one another and remember this: we keep faith. Our profits are large, but we are honest.’
 

Mr. Robinson might or might not be a good choice for a ‘lead’ character, but he adds an interesting layer to Christie’s work as a secondary one.

We could say the same thing of Eleanor Wish, who appears in several of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch novels. When we meet her in The Black Echo, she’s an FBI agent works with Bosch on a complicated case involving a major carefully-planned bank robbery, the murder of Vietnam veteran, and a group of Vietnamese families who live in Orange County (south of Los Angeles). Wish leaves the FBI and takes up a new career as a professional poker player. She’s still helpful to Bosch in some of his cases (see Trunk Music), and the two develop a relationship. Eventually they marry. The marriage doesn’t last, but they have a daughter Madeleine ‘Maddie’ together. And there are suggestions that Bosch never really stops loving Wish. She is an interesting person with a bit of a mysterious background. She’s also very much her own person with her own way of thinking. Like Mr. Robinson, Eleanor Wish might or might not have been successful as the ‘lead’ character in a novel or series, but as a secondary character, she adds much to the Bosch novels.

Elly Griffiths’ series features Ruth Galloway, Head of Forensic Archaeology at North Norfolk University. It also features DCI Harry Nelson, who benefits greatly from Galloway’s help on his cases. They are the two protagonists, and both are very interesting characters. But one of the most interesting characters in this series doesn’t really get ‘top billing.’ He is Michael Malone, who goes by his Druid name of Cathbad. He and Galloway met years ago on a dig, and have now become friends. We don’t know an awful lot about Cathbad’s past, and that adds a bit of mystery to his character. But he’s interesting for more reasons than that. Cathbad is an unconventional person, even eccentric. But he is extremely knowledgeable about ancient customs in Romano-Britain, and he’s well versed in even older lore. He has a different way of looking at life to the way a lot of other people do, but that doesn’t really bother him. He is loyal to his friends (including Galloway), and he’s quite good with her young daughter Kate. He adds a layer of interest to this series.

Anthony Bidulka’s Russell Quant is a Saskatoon former cop-turned-PI who encounters all sorts of interesting people in his cases. He’s the protagonist of the series, and is a well-developed character in his own right. But some of the secondary characters who figure in the series are at least as engaging. For example, as the series begins, Quant’s neighbour is Sereena Orion Smith. She’s had all sorts of experiences, including plenty with drugs, alcohol and more than one wild party. Now she’s settled into a quieter life, and seems to be content with that. She’s got plenty of money, and as the series evolves we get to learn just a few things about her. But she is still somewhat of a mystery. She pops up in unexpected places and seems to know the most unexpected people. And although he’s curious at times, Quant never really does find out a great deal about her. What he does know though is that she’s a plain-spoken, loyal and supportive friend. She’s the kind of friend who likes Quant enough to tell him the truth, whether or not he wants to hear it. And she proves to be helpful to him in more than one of his cases.

Timothy Hallinan’s Philip ‘Poke’ Rafferty series takes place mostly in Bangkok and features Rafferty, who is an ex-pat American and a travel writer by trade. But he has also proven himself rather good at finding people who don’t want to be found. He’s also well-enough versed in Bangkok life that he can be very helpful to English-speaking foreigners who visit. He is the protagonist of the series, but he’s by no means the only strong and interesting character in it. His wife Rose is also compelling. Rose is a former bar girl who originally came from one of Thailand’s more remote villages. She has since left the bar life and now owns her own apartment cleaning company staffed by other former bar girls and prostitutes who want to leave that life. Rose is a deeper character than it may sometimes seem on the surface. She is Thai, so she sees life from that cultural point of view. In her way, she is also spiritual, and that adds to the richness of her character. Rose may not be the central character of this series, but she contributes a great deal to it.

That’s also true of attorney Zack Shreve, whom we meet in Gail Bowen’s series featuring Joanne Kilbourn (later Shreve). Joanne is the main character in this series; she’s a political scientist and academic who’s also the proud mother of three grown children and one teenager. Joanne first meets Zack in The Last Good Day, when one of his firm’s law partners dies in what looks like a suicide. The two begin a relationship and as the series progresses, they fall in love and marry. Zack proves to be a very strong character although he’s not really the main protagonist. He’s got a distinctive personality and brings his own background and viewpoint to the series. What’s more, since he’s an attorney, he also brings professional expertise (and several plot points!) to the novels.

Strong secondary characters like these can be a bit tricky to write. After all, they’re not protagonists, and perhaps they wouldn’t do well in series of their own (‘though some might). But they do add much to a series, and many readers follow them almost as avidly as they do the protagonists. Which strong secondary characters do you like best?

 

 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is the title of a Bob Dylan song.

30 Comments

Filed under Agatha Christie, Anthony Bidulka, Elly Griffiths, Gail Bowen, Michael Connelly, Timothy Hallinan

When We Get Together It’s So Much Fun*

OnlineGroupsWhen the Internet first came into popular use, many people saw it as a new way to get information and to do research. Of course, lots of people, myself included, still use it for that purpose. But in the last ten years or so, people have discovered an entirely new use for the Internet: online groups. It used to be that people with a common interest or a common cause had to work to meet one another and share their interest. Now, with just a few keyboard clicks, one can join any number of online groups. It’s dangerously easy.

And crime fiction novels have kept up with this important development in the way we communicate. There are now a number of novels that bring up (some that feature) the way in which we use the Internet to join together. As you’ll see, even when people use online groups to try to do some good, things don’t always work out well.

In Alafair Burke’s 212, for instance, we meet Megan Gunther, a New York Univeristy (NYU) undergraduate student. She’s joined an online community called Campus Juice to keep informed about what’s happening on campus and, if she’s honest, to keep up with the campus gossip. One day, she’s checking the website during class and notices her own name among the postings. Shocked, she checks the group’s site again as soon as she can, and reads what’s been said about her. To her dismay, someone’s posted her class schedule as well as some things about her social life (e.g. when she goes to the gym). The post ends with the disturbing sentence

 

‘Megan Gunther, someone is watching.’

 

When Megan is stabbed to death, it’s clear that someone’s been using the interest group to target her. NYPD detectives Ellie Hatcher and J.J. Rogan are assigned to the case and begin their investigation. This turns out to be far more than a case of dangerous stalking when Hatcher finds out that this murder is connected to the murders of two other people: a bodyguard and a real estate agent who ‘moonlights’ as a prostitute.

Michael Connelly’s Angels Flight features a horrible use of online groups: child pornography. In that novel, LAPD cop Harry Bosch investigates the murder of prominent lawyer Howard Elias. He’s murdered just before an important trial in which he was to represent Michael Harris in a high-profile lawsuit against the LAPD. The suit alleges that the police used illegal (to put it mildly) tactics to coerce a confession of rape and murder from Harris. The victim in that case was twelve-year-old Stacey Kincaid, and the more Bosch learns about the investigation into Stacey’s death, the more he sees that there was indeed police misconduct on many levels. That leads him to re-open the Kincaid case as well as continue to look into the Elias murder. And both trails lead to an online interest group. Crime fiction fans will know, too, that this is only one of many crime novels in which online child pornography/child trafficking interest groups play a role.

Cat Connor’s Killerbyte features an online group dedicated to poetry. Called Cobwebs, it’s moderated by FBI agent Gabrielle ‘Ellie’ Conway and Cormac ‘Mac’ Connelly. One night, group member Carter McClaren shows up at Conway’s home, ready to ‘pay her back’ for having banned him from the group. He’s arrested, but soon makes bail. Then, he’s murdered. Attached to the body is an adhesive note with a poem written on it. Conway and Connelly also begin to receive email taunts from the killer. Then, there’s another body found, also with a poem. And another. It’s clear now that someone in the group is a murderer, but this is not a case of a mad serial killer who hates poetry. It’s more complicated than that, and Conway and Connelly have to work to find out who is using their group to kill before they become victims themselves. 

In Helen Fitzgerald’s The Cry, Joanna Lindsay and Alistair Robertson travel from Scotland to Melbourne with their nine-week-old son Noah. This is Lindsay’s first trip to Australia, but for Robertson, it’s a homecoming. They land safely and begin the long drive from the airport to their final destination. They’re on their way when they have to face every parent’s worst nightmare: the loss of baby Noah. News of the missing baby soon gets out of course, and the Australian media goes into high gear, publishing every detail of the search for the baby, interviews with people and so on. And the case generates a lot of interest. There are several websites and other online groups set up; some are charitable giving sites and others are discussion sites. At first, there is an outpouring of sympathy for Noah’s parents, but after a short time, questions begin to arise about the case. Little by little, that support turns to suspicion and before long, there are just as many websites set up to vilify, especially, Lindsay as there are in support of the family.

And then there’s Qiu Xiaolong’s Enigma of China. Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police is assigned to ‘rubber stamp’ the case of the death of Zhou Keng, Head of Shanghai’s Housing Development Committee. The official police explanation of Zhou’s death is suicide, and that’s logical, considering the victim was on the point of being brought down by an investigation into his unscrupulous activities. Chen’s not completely convinced this is a suicide though, and he begins to ask questions. He finds that Zhou’s activities came out through the online community of ‘netizens’ who join interest groups because for them, it’s the only way to speak out about some of the things going on in China. Chen finds out that the authorities keep very close tabs on what these groups do and what’s posted for obvious reasons. At the same time, they use the information the groups post for their own purposes. It’s among other things an interesting look at the way communication has gone online in the last decades.

Online groups bring together people from all over the world who might not otherwise have the chance to connect. They can be fun, enriching, helpful and supportive. I know I feel that way about the online crime fiction reading and writing communities I’m lucky enough to have joined. On the other hand, you just might want to be careful about the groups you’re thinking about joining… ;-)

Now if you’ll excuse me, it’s time to catch up with my group’s postings!

 

 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Ziggy Marley’s Family Time.

26 Comments

Filed under Alafair Burke, Cat Connor, Helen Fitzgerald, Michael Connelly, Qiu Xiaolong