Category Archives: Carl Hiaasen

Hanging Tough, Staying Hungry*

EntrepreneursIt takes a lot of courage and bold planning to start up one’s own business. The odds are against success, and even if a person does launch a successful company, there’s a heavy cost in terms of time and personal life. But people open their own businesses all the time, trusting that they’ll do well and their companies will flourish.

Crime fiction is full of PIs who’ve take the risk to set up shop for themselves. Mentioning them on this post would be too easy. But there are plenty of other entrepreneurs in genre. Sometimes they do well, and sometimes…not well at all. Either way, people who start their own businesses can make for very interesting characters.

For example, in Agatha Christie’s After the Funeral (AKA Funerals are Fatal) we meet Susan Banks. She has dreams of opening up her own beauty salon, and the business acumen and bold planning that are needed to start one’s own company. But she and her husband Greg don’t have the money to stake such a venture. We learn as the story goes on that she approached her wealthy uncle Richard Abernethie, but he refused to help. When Abernethie dies, apparently of natural causes, his family gathers for the funeral. At the gathering, his youngest sister Cora Lansquenet blurts out that he was murdered. At first no-one takes her seriously. But when she herself is killed the next day, everyone begins to believe that she might have been right. The family attorney Mr. Entwhistle asks Hercule Poirot to investigate, and he agrees. Susan immediately becomes ‘a person of interest’ because of her determination to have her own business – and because she has now inherited the money she needs to open her salon. It doesn’t help her case that she can’t really prove her whereabouts on either occasion. But as Poirot and Mr. Entwhistle find out, there are several suspects in this case…

Gail Bowen’s Joanne Kilbourn Shreve discovers the same entrepreneurial spirit in her daughter Mieka. Like many parents, Joanne wants to see her daughter go to university and get a good education. And at first, that’s what Mieka does. But by the end of the first year, she’s made other plans. She decides to open her own catering business. In one story arc in this series, we see how Mieka has to convince her mother that the business can be successful. She does what new business owners have to do: study the market, look for an opening, decide on one’s talents and interests, and put together a business plan. It takes some time for Joanne to get used to the idea, but Mieka makes a go of it. Later, she uses the same initiative to develop a playground, UpSlideDown. Mieka has faults, as we all do, but she doesn’t lack in courage or bold planning.

There are several ‘regulars’ in Lilian Jackson Braun’s series featuring features journalist James ‘Qwill’ Qwilleran. Throughout most of the series, he lives and works in a small town, where readers get to know many of the other people who live there. One of those people is Lori Bamba. She starts out as Qwill’s part-time secretary, who also happens to be quite gifted with cats. So he depends a lot on her as he gets used to having his own two Siamese. As the series goes on, Lori and her husband Nick get involved in several new business ventures. One, for instance, is the Domino Inn, which we learn about in The Cat Who Came to Breakfast. It’s located on Breakfast Island/AKA Pear Island, Grand Island, and Providence Island, a holiday/fishing community with a certain tourist appeal. Lori and Nick are concerned about some strange incidents that look like sabotage, so Qwill arranges a stay at the Domino to look into the matter. What he finds goes much deeper and is much more dangerous that someone playing nasty pranks. The Bambas don’t always succeed in their ventures, but they have energy and resilience – and creative ideas.

In Timothy Hallinan’s Philip ‘Poke’ Rafferty series, we meet another entrepreneur, Rose. Originally from a small village in the country, she ended up in Bangkok, where she became a bar girl. She’s no longer in that business any more, and has started up a new apartment-cleaning company of her own. There’s plenty of competition, and Rose isn’t exactly wealthy. But she has a lot of courage. And what’s interesting about her company is that all of her employees are former bar girls who’ve had enough of that life and want to get out of it.

Walter Mosley’s Fear of the Dark is in great part the story of Paris Minton. A year before the events in the story, he opened the Florence Avenue Used Bookshop, hoping to run a peaceful business. He’s not at all what you’d call bold or a person of initiative. But he does love books, and just wanted a place where he could make a living and indulge his passtion. And for a year, he’s done all right for himself. Then his cousin Ulysses S. Grant IV ‘Useless’ pays him a visit. At first, Minton doesn’t even want to let his cousin in; Useless has been nothing but trouble, sometimes very bad trouble, all his life. But eventually Minton yields. Useless asks him for a place to stay, but Minton refuses. At first, Minton doesn’t think much of it – until Useless disappears and Minton’s aunt asks him to track Useless down. For that, Minton turns to his friend Fearless Jones, who’s the kind of person you want on your side in a fight. Jones and Minton go looking for Useless, and find instead a complicated blackmail scheme and some very dangerous people who are also looking for Useless…

And then there’s Carl Hiaasen’s Nature Girl. In one plot thread of that novel, we meet Sammy Tigertail, who was born Chad McQueen. He is half White/half Seminole, and not sure where he fits in with either community. He sets up his own new business offering airboat rides through the Florida Everglades. When his first client dies of a heart attack during the trip, Sammy decides that this business is not going to be successful, especially if enough tourists hear that his client died. So he heads deep into the wilderness and ends up in Dismal Key. That happens to be the place where Honey Santana is leading Boyd Shreave on a kayak trip that could turn out to be disastrous for him. She’s getting back at Boyd for verbal abuse during a telemarketing call he made. There are other characters in pursuit of both of them, so Sammy hardly gets the peace and quiet he feels he needs after his venture failed. This is a Hiaasen novel, so as you can imagine, all of the characters’ lives intersect in some unusual ways.

Not all business ventures are quite that adventurous. But all new businesses need courage, a lot of time, a lot of faith, and some luck. Money doesn’t hurt, either. Which fictional ones have stayed with you?



*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Survivor’s Eye of the Tiger.


Filed under Agatha Christie, Carl Hiaasen, Gail Bowen, Lilian Jackson Braun, Timothy Hallinan, Walter Mosley

I May Be Crazy*

Self DoubtMost of us would like to think we can trust our own thinking. No-one’s perfect of course, but we like to think we can make sense of what we see and hear and so on. So it’s frightening to think that we can’t believe what we think is true – that we can’t trust our own mental processes. That feeling of ‘I’m not crazy – am I?’ is woven into a lot of crime fiction, and can make for a suspenseful plot thread or character layer.

Agatha Christie uses it in some of her work. For instance, in Sleeping Murder, Giles and Gwenda Reed are newlyweds looking for their first home. Gwenda is particularly drawn to a house in Dilmouth, and she and Giles make the purchase arrangement. Soon though, Gwenda begins to have some strange experiences. She has an odd sense of déjà vu about the place, although she doesn’t really remember being there before. To make matters worse, she sees images of a dead woman lying in the hall. Worried that she might be having some sort of mental breakdown, Gwenda takes some time away and visits her cousin Raymond West and his wife. Christie fans will know that West’s Aunt Jane (Marple) takes a great interest in human nature, and is sympathetic towards Gwenda. One night, they go to the theatre, where Gwenda has a bizarre reaction to one scene. Miss Marple is soon convinced that something really is going on in the house at Dilmouth, and that Gwenda isn’t crazy. So she begins to investigate. In the end, she finds that the house holds an important secret from the past. Christie fans will also know that Miss Marple is sure that her friend Elspeth McGillicuddy isn’t crazy when she thinks she sees a murder being committed in4:50 From Paddington (AKA What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw!). And there’s a Christie story in which a character is manipulated by a killer into taking responsibility for murder. No spoilers – those who’ve read it will know which story I mean…

In Cornell Woolrich’s Night Has a Thousand Eyes, New York Homicide Bureau Detective Tom Shawn is taking a late-night walk when he meets a young woman who’s about to jump off a bridge. He convinces her to not to follow through, and takes her to an all-night diner where she tells him her story. She is Jean Reid, only child of wealthy Harlan Reid. Until recently, she’s had a good life. But everything changed when her father took a business trip to San Francisco. When a housemaid warned of a fatal plane crash, Jane almost sent a telegram to her father to take another flight back. At the last minute, she didn’t do so; yet, her father did receive a telegram and changed his plans. When he returned safely, the two of them decided to find out how the housemaid knew about the crash. The trail leads to a man named Jeremiah Tompkins, who sees himself as cursed with being able to predict the future. Harlan Reid began to visit Tompkins and made use of what he learned to make an even bigger success of himself in business. Then, Tompkins predicted the other man’s death. Now convinced he will die on a certain night at midnight, Reid has lost hope and become a shadow of his former self. With this background, Shawn decides to help Jean, and gets involved in the business. He finds that this case has a lot to do with people’s states of mind and with not trusting one’s own thinking.

So does Ellery Queen’s Ten Days Wonder. Howard Van Horn has been having a series of troubling blackouts lately. One day he wakes up from one of them to discover he’s got blood on himself and his clothes. Convinced that he’s done something horrible, he visits his former college friend Ellery Queen and asks his advice. Queen agrees to look into the case. The trail leads to the small town of Wrightsville, where Van Horn’s father Dietrich lives with his second wife Sally. During the visit, Howard has another blackout; this time, Sally is found murdered. Howard doesn’t remember the murder, but finds it hard not to believe the evidence against him. Queen, however, is less sure. Throughout the novel, we see the growing fear as Howard increasingly doubts his own sanity.

Gail Bowen’s Deadly Appearances introduces readers to academician and political scientist Joanne Kilbourn. When her good friend Androu ‘Andy’ Boychuk dies of what turns out to be poison, Kilbourn is devastated. As a way of dealing with her grief, she decides to write a biography of Boychuk. As she gets material for the book, Kilbourn also gets closer to the truth about the murder. In the meantime, she begins to suffer from an odd illness. At first, it doesn’t seem like much. Then, the symptoms get strange and more severe. For a time, Kilbourn isn’t sure exactly what to believe about it, and there’s a real sense of her anxiety as she tries to puzzle out whether she’s imagining things or is really ill (and if so, what the problem is). It’s an interesting look at what it’s like to be sure that something is wrong and at the same time, wonder if it’s ‘all in the head.’

In Catherine O’Flynn’s What Was Lost, we meet Kurt, a security guard at Green Oaks Shopping Center. Part of his job involves monitoring the mall’s security cameras. During one session, he sees a young girl with a backpack. The mall’s closed, so he gets concerned that she may be lost or abandoned. The image isn’t clear, but he looks into the matter. That’s when things get strange. He can’t find the girl, although he sees her during more than one of his shifts. One night, he happens to meet with Lisa Palmer, who works at Your Music, one of the stores in the mall. They strike up an awkward friendship and Kurt tells her what he’s seen. Each in a different way, they try to find out what it all means. To do so, they have to look twenty years into the past, and to the disappearance of ten-year-old Kate Meaney.

And then there’s Carl Hiaasen’s Skinny Dip. Charles ‘Chaz’ Perrone is a marine biologist (at least in name), who’s been hired by agribusiness tycoon Samuel Johnson ‘Red’ Hammernut. Perrone’s developed a way to make water tests come out with ‘clean’ results; and that’s just what Hammernut needs to ensure that the mandatory water samples taken near his company’s Everglades property won’t get him into trouble. When Perrone’s wife Joey begins to suspect what’s going on, he decides to solve the problem by pushing her overboard during a cruise. What he doesn’t know is that she survives and is rescued by former cop Mick Stranahan. Determined to find out why her husband wanted her dead, Joey works out a plan of revenge. First, she begins to play ‘mind games’ with him. For instance, she turns on the sprinkler system in the house when he’s not home. Then, Stranahan pretends to be a blackmailer who saw what Perrone did. Together, they make a nervous wreck of Perrone. He becomes increasingly unstable, which doesn’t exactly endear him either to Hammernut or to Broward County, Florida police detective Karl Rolvaag, who’s always suspected him…

There are other stories, too, in which one of the plot threads revolves around questioning one’s own thinking. It can be very scary, so it’s little wonder that it’s an effective suspense-building tool. These are a few examples. Your turn.



*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Billy Joel’s You May be Right.


Filed under Agatha Christie, Carl Hiaasen, Catherine O'Flynn, Cornell Woolrich, Ellery Queen, Gail Bowen

There Were Incidents and Accidents*

So-Called AccidentsSome deaths are quite obviously murders. In those cases, at least in crime fiction, the killer doesn’t try to hide the fact that it was murder. Rather, the murderer may work hard at an alibi, or may work hard to prove there was no motive. But really, it’s much easier to disguise the murder as an accident if it’s possible. And sometimes, that makes it awfully difficult to prove that a death was murder.

Examples of murders made to look like accidents run all through crime fiction, possibly because it’s really credible that someone would want to cover up a murder that way. Whatever the reason, there are a lot of examples – many more than I could list in one post. But here are a few.

Agatha Christie uses the so-called accident in several of her stories. To take just one example, in Cards on the Table, Hercule Poirot is invited to a very unusual dinner. The enigmatic Mr. Shaitana gathers four sleuths (including Poirot) and four people that he hints have gotten away with murder. After the meal, everyone settles in to play bridge. During the evening, someone stabs Mr. Shaitana. The only possible suspects are the four people who were in the room at the time – the very four people Shaitana more or less accused of murder. Now the four sleuths are faced with the task of figuring out which of these equally-plausible suspects is guilty. One of them is Anne Meredith. At one point, she’d served as companion to a Mrs. Benson, who died tragically of poisoning by hat paint. Apparently, she confused the hat paint with her medicine, a very plausible accident. Or was it?

In Peter Høeg’s Smilla’s Sense of Snow (AKA Miss Smilla’s Feeling For Snow), a young boy Isaiah Christiansen tragically dies after a fall from the roof of the Copenhagen apartment building where he lives. Isaiah had befriended fellow Greenlander Smilla Jasperson, and she is upset at his death. She’s drawn to the scene of the accident, and when she gets there, she sees signs in the snow that lead her to believe that the boy’s death was not accidental. She begins to ask questions and soon discovers that some dangerous people are determined to hide the truth. She persists though, and her search for answers takes her back to her homeland, where she finds the connection between Isaiah’s death and some secrets hidden in Greenland.

Christopher Fowler’s Full Dark House introduces Arthur Bryant and John May of London’s Peculiar Crimes Unit (PCU). The novel actually tells two stories, one of which is a recounting of the PCU’s first case. In 1940, the Palace Theatre is set to do a production of Orpheus. Then one of the dancers Tanya Capistrania dies in what some say is a freak accident. The police are investigating that death when Charles Senechal, who was to play the role of Jupiter in the production, is killed by a piece of scenery. Again it’s regarded as a terrible accident, but an accident nonetheless. Still, it’s beginning to look very much as though someone is determined to stop the production. When another death occurs, and then a disappearance, Bryant and May and their team come under intense pressure to solve the case before there are any more tragedies.

Louise Penny’s Still Life is our introduction to the small rural Québec town of Three Pines. One of its residents Jane Neal is killed during the Thanksgiving holiday in what looks like a hunting accident. Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté du Québec is called to the scene, and he soon finds that this death was actually a murder. The question though is who would have had a motive. The victim was a beloved former teacher whom everyone seemed to respect. Gamache and the team get to know the town, though, and some of its history. And it’s in the past that they find the motive and therefore, the killer.

In Carl Hiaasen’s Skinny Dip, Charles ‘Chaz’ Perrone thinks he’s found a great new way to make money. He’s a marine biologist (well, in name at least) who’s hired by agribusiness owner Samuel Johnson ‘Red’ Hammernut. Hammernut’s company has been accused of pouring toxic waste into Florida’s Everglades, and Hammernut needs proof that his company doesn’t pollute. Perrone offers that in the form of a way he’s developed to fake the results of water testing so the water looks clean. The two begin to do business and all goes well enough at first. Then, Perrone’s wife Joey begins to suspect what’s going on, and threatens to report it. Now he needs to get rid of her, so he tells her they’re going on an anniversary cruise of the Everglades. While they’re on the trip, he pushes Joey overboard, thinking that’s the end of his problems. At first everyone, including the police, thinks it’s a terrible accident and there’s much sympathy for Perrone. What he doesn’t know though is that Joey didn’t drown, and she’s made her own plans for revenge…

And then there’s Dawn Harris’ Letter From a Dead Man. In the late 18th-Century Lady Drusilla Davenish lives on the Isle of Wight with her Aunt Thirza and Thirza’s daughter Lucie. The family is excited about Lucie’s upcoming wedding to Giles Saxborough. Everything changes though, when Giles’ father (and Lady Drusilla’s godfather) Cuthbert Saxborough dies in what looks like a tragic riding accident. But things don’t quite add up for Lady Drusilla. Her godfather was an expert horseman. It’s highly unlikely that he’d have died in that way. So she starts to ask questions. Not long afterwards, Giles’ older brother Thomas and his son Tom are both killed in what’s put down as a horrible yachting accident. But Lady Drusilla is convinced that it’s more than that. And there’s more than one possible explanation. It might be connected to a smuggling operation she’s recently discovered. Or it might be someone with a vendetta against the Saxborough family. Or it might be something else…

In Angela Savage’s The Half Child, Bangkok-based PI Jayne Keeney is hired by Jim Delbeck to find out what happened to his daughter Maryanne. She was a volunteer at the New Life Children’s Centre in Pattaya when she fell from the roof of the building where she was living. The police report suggests it might have been suicide, but Delbeck doesn’t think so. It could also have very well been an accident. Whatever the cause, Delbeck wants to know the truth about his daughter’s death. Keeney takes the case and travels to Pattaya. As a part of her investigations, she decides to learn more about at New Life, going undercover as a volunteer. As she gets closer to the truth about Maryanne’s life and death, she finds out that some people do not want their secrets revealed…

At least in fiction, murders designed to look like accidents can serve a lot of purposes. They can give murderers effective ways to hide their crimes. They can also give the author a way to build suspense and interest. And they can allow the author the chance to lead the reader up the proverbial garden path. After all, sometimes an accident is just an accident. There are so many other examples of this plot point in crime fiction – many more than I could name. So…what gaps have I left?



*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Paul Simon’s You Can Call Me Al.


Filed under Agatha Christie, Angela Savage, Carl Hiaasen, Christopher Fowler, Dawn Harris, Louise Penny, Peter Høeg

We Can Change the World*

Change the WorldLet’s face it; we don’t live in a perfect world. And I’m sure all of us see particular things (e.g. poverty, the state of the environment, bigotry, etc.) that we would especially like to change. That’s often why people become volunteers, engage in protests, make donations and the like. That desire to change the world can be a very strong motivator and like all driving forces, can get us into trouble. And yet, most of us would agree that somebody has to be out there working for change. There are plenty of characters in crime fiction who are driven by the desire to make the world better. Some, we might argue, are at the very least misguided. Others are people we might even call noble. Either way, they make for interesting characters in crime novels. Here are just a few examples to show you what I mean.

In Agatha Christie’s One, Two, Buckle My Shoe (AKA The Patriotic Murders and An Overdose of Death), we meet Howard Raikes. He’s a young political activist who wants badly to overthrow the current British government and economic system and start over with a new world order. It’s his belief that the cautious government and banking system hold back positive change and progress. In one sub-plot of the novel, he’s struck up a friendship with Jane Olivera, the American niece of wealthy and powerful banker Alistair Blunt. To Raikes, Blunt is the epitome of everything that needs to be swept away, and he wants Jane to leave her home with Blunt and join him in his effort to change everything. She likes Raikes and agrees with some of his beliefs. But at the same time, she’s not nearly as militant and she is fond of her uncle. One day, Blunt’s dentist Henry Morley is shot in his surgery, and it’s not long before the police begin to wonder whether the original target was actually Blunt, since he’s made his share of enemies. It turns out that Raikes was there that morning, so he becomes one of the suspects in the murder. Hercule Poirot was also at the surgery that morning, so Chief Inspector Japp asks his help in finding out who really killed the dentist and why. Throughout the novel we can see how committed Raikes is to making a better world, even if we don’t agree on his methods or all of his ideas.

Donna Leon’s Through a Glass, Darkly has as most of its context Venice’s glass-blowing industry. It’s a very old and very lucrative business, and Giovanni de Cal has made plenty of money from his glass-blowing factory. But there is evidence that those factories are major polluters and are very bad for the environment. So a group of activists stages protests of de Cal’s factory. One of the leaders of that group is his own son-in-law Marco Ribetti. When Ribetti is arrested during a protest, he asks his friend Ispettore Lorenzo Vianello for help. Vianello agrees to see what he can do, and he and his boss Comissario Guido Brunetti arrange for Ribetti’s release. But that’s far from the end of the story. One of de Cal’s employees is night watchman Giorgio Tassini, who is convinced that the company is dumping toxic waste, and who tells his story to anyone who will listen. One night Tassini is killed in what looks like a terrible accident. But Brunetti isn’t sure his death is accidental. So he and Vianello look into the matter. In the characters of both Ribetti and Tassini, we see that strong desire to change the world and make it better.

Carl Hiaasen’s Lucky You introduces us to JoLayne Lucks, a lover of the environment who gets her chance to do some real good when she wins a lottery worth US$14 million. She plans to do her bit to change the world by purchasing a piece of land in Florida and turning it into a nature preserve to keep it out of the hands of developers. But then her ticket is stolen by a group of neo-Nazis who want the money to fund a militia. Features writer Tom Krone of The Register is assigned to do an in-depth story on JoLayne, but instead finds himself drawn into her plot to get the ticket back. This brings Krone up against the thieves, some land developers and their thugs, and a religious scam.

In Deon Meyer’s Blood Safari, Emma le Roux hires professional bodyguard Martin Lemmer to escort her from Cape Town to the Lowveld. Emma has discovered that her brother Jacobus, who was thought dead for years, may actually be alive. If he is alive, she wants to find him. If not, she wants to know that too, and the trail has led to his last known whereabouts in the Lowveld.  One possible lead is at the Heuningklip Wildlife Preserve, so the two visit the place. It’s run by Stef Moller, a true lover of the environment who’s not keen on tourists visiting. He’s far more interested in the animals and other wildlife and not interested in making money from the tourist trade. And in fact that passion for the environment and for changing the world through preserving it plays an important role in this novel.

And then there’s Riel Delorme, whom we meet in Gail Bowen’s series featuring academician and political scientist Joanne Kilbourn Shreve. In Kaleidoscope, we learn that Delorme is a Métis activist who is one of the leaders of the Warriors, a group that’s dead-set against development. He also happens to be one of Joanne’s former graduate students. He and the other activists oppose the creation of a new community designed to improve the economically depressed North Central area of Regina. Their claim is that the new planned community will only put money into developer Leland Hunter’s pocket. When one of Hunter’s employees is killed, it’s quite possible that Delorme had something to do with it, but matters aren’t that simple. What’s more, it turns out that Joanne’s daughter Mieka is romantically involved with Riel, so the case is quite complicated on a personal level as well as on the larger level. And this novel addresses the whole issue of how to make the world, or at least that small part of it, a better place. There are conflicting views about how to address issues such as the disenfranchisement of the poor, racism and other social problems.

Antti Tuomainen’s The Healer takes place in an apocalyptic world in which climate change has wreaked havoc and life is descending little by little into complete anarchy. Only people with a great deal of money feel any sort of safety and that’s because they can afford the services of private security companies. It’s a dangerous and bleak world, and many people have given up on it. Against this backdrop, poet Tapani Lehtinen risks his life to find his wife Johanna, a journalist who has disappeared. Lehtinen learns that she was pursuing a story about a man calling himself the Healer. He’s claimed responsibility for the deaths of several corporate executives he holds responsible for the destruction of the planet. The murders have been committed, says the Healer, to call attention to the ruin of the planet and to avenge those whose lives have been destroyed because of it. Lehtinen follows the story, hoping that the trail will lead him to his wife. As he gets close to the truth about the Healer, he also gets closer to the truth about Johanna. Among other things, this novel addresses the whole issue of trying to make the world better. We may be against the Healer’s methods, but the more Lehtinen learns about the Healer, the more we can see where the motivation comes from.

And that’s the thing about some of those who try to change the world. Sometimes their methods are at the least misguided. Sometimes they do incredible amounts of good. And sometimes there’s a razor-thin line between the two…


*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s Chicago.


Filed under Agatha Christie, Antti Tuomainen, Carl Hiaasen, Deon Meyer, Donna Leon, Gail Bowen

Golden Words and Silver Tongue*

Silver TongueHave you ever known someone with the kind of glib persuasiveness that could make you believe black was white? Not all people with a so-called ‘silver tongue’ have unpleasant ulterior motives, but they can certainly get people to do whatever they want. And very often you do find that confidence tricksters and other scam artists are persuasive like that. The savvy person knows that nothing comes without a price, and things that look too good to be real probably are. But even they can sometimes be moved to do things they might not ordinarily do, and all because of the so-called ‘silver tongue.’

We certainly see plenty of characters like that in crime fiction. In Agatha Christie’s Mrs. McGinty’s Dead, for example, detective story author Ariadne Oliver has come to the village of Broadhinny to collaborate on the adaptation of one of her novels for the stage. Her partner in the project is budding playwright Robin Upward, who lives in the village with his mother. He’s got talent, and a vision of what he wants the play to be, and one of the sub-plots of the novel concerns his attempts to convince Mrs. Oliver that he’s right. For her part, Mrs. Oliver doesn’t care at all for Upward’s ideas about the play. The result he has in mind is nothing like her book, and that infuriates her. So he doesn’t succeed at winning her over, but it’s not for want of a ‘silver tongue’ and a real effort to persuade her. The play loses its interest for Mrs. Oliver when Hercule Poirot arrives in the village. He’s been asked to investigate the murder of a charwoman whom everyone thinks was killed by her lodger. Superintendent Spence thinks the man’s innocent though, and Poirot sets out to find the truth.

John Grant’s (AKA Jonathan Gash) Lovejoy also has a glib and persuasive way about him. He is an antiques dealer who is absolutely passionate about getting hold of the pieces he wants. In fact, that’s his main interest in life. And when he has his eye on a particular object, or when an opportunity comes his way, he can be highly charming and persuasive. He will say whatever it takes to get what he wants at the best prices possible. He admits it himself in The Judas Pair:


‘We dealers are pretty slick. Some are all right but some are not…Cleverer than any artist, better than any actor. They’ll pick your house clean in any way they can and brag about it in the pub afterwards.’


In that novel, Lovejoy works to track down a pair of mythical dueling pistols, one of which was likely used to commit murder. He finds himself involved even more deeply when there’s another murder.

In Carl Hiaasen’s Skinny Dip, we meet Charles ‘Chaz’ Perrone, a marine biologist (mostly in name) who works for a large agribusiness firm owned by Samuel Johnson ‘Red’ Hammernut. Hammernut is ‘in the sights’ of government authorities who believe his company is pouring toxic waste into the Florida Everglades. In order to prevent a media disaster and government prosecution, Hammernut engages Perrone to prove that the water near his firm is not polluted. Perrone is happy to oblige. For one thing, that proof is worth a lot of money to Hammernut. For another, Perrone has come upon a way to alter water tests so that it looks as though the water is safe. All goes well for a time. Perrone has a very glib tongue and has talked his way out of all sorts of difficult situations and into all sorts of women’s beds. Even his wife Joey trusts him, and she’s basically a smart person. That intelligence becomes a problem when she finds out what her husband’s been doing. Seeing no other option, he takes her on a cruise, allegedly to celebrate their anniversary, and pushes her overboard. Joey survives though, and finds her own way to strike back. In the meantime, Perrone has to use his glibness again when the police begin to suspect him.

Louise Penny’s A Fatal Grace (AKA Dead Cold) introduces us to C.C. de Poitiers. She’s a celebrated ‘life coach’ who’s founded a company Be Calm to sell her image, her lifestyle suggestions and the inevitable related products and services. She’s got a best-selling book in print, too, with the same name. She’s quite good at selling herself and her message, and lots of people take her at her word. But the reality of her life is quite different. When she and her family move to the small Québec town of Three Pines, everyone soon sees that she is hard-edged, malicious and verbally cruel. On Boxing Day, everyone gathers for the traditional curling match that takes place in the area. During the match, de Poitiers is electrocuted. Chief Inspector Armand Gamache and his team investigate the murder and they have plenty of suspects.

One of the funnier examples of the ‘silver tongue’ is in Teresa Solana’s series featuring Barcelona PI brothers Eduard and Josep ‘Borja’ Martínez. Of the two of them, Borja is the one with the persuasive ability. He has the gift of being able to charm just about anyone into anything, and talk his way out of nearly every dicey situation. In fact, he even persuades his brother to get involved in more then one risky plan in A Not So Perfect Crime, when they investigate their first murder. And he juggles two mistresses, one of whom is wealthy enough that Borja can easily wear the designer clothes he prefers, and indulge in expensive haircuts and meals.

And he’s not the only PI who can be glib and persuasive. Anthony Bidulka’s Saskatoon-based PI Russell Quant would much rather talk his way out of a situation than throw punches or use a weapon. He can get people to do what he wants too, when he puts his mind to it. In Flight of Aquavit for instance, he is hired to find out who’s been blackmailing successful accountant Daniel Guest. The trail leads to a local repertory theatre company, but Quant knows that they won’t just volunteer personal information to a stranger, so he’ll have to be at his most charming and persuasive. So he adopts another name and ‘cover story’ and turns on the proverbial charm. He manages to convince the receptionist to get the information he wants, and uses it to get closer to the answers he needs. There are plenty of other PIs too who have that ability to be glib (I know, I know, fans of Rex Stout’s Archie Goodwin).

And then there’s Jack Hardy, whom we meet in Wendy James’ Out of the Silence. That’s the fictional account of the life of Maggie Heffernan, who was imprisoned in Melbourne in 1900 for the drowning of her baby son. James shows us how it all began when Maggie meets Jack. He’s not only attractive, but he’s persuasive and glib. It’s not long before she’s in love with him and he seems to reciprocate. He leads her to believe that they’ll be married as soon as they can, but that they have to keep their engagement secret until he gets himself set up in a good job. Shortly afterwards, he leaves to find work in New South Wales. When Maggie discovers that she’s pregnant, she writes to him repeatedly but gets no answer. Knowing that her parents won’t accept her back in their home, she travels to Melbourne and finds a job in a Guest House. Once baby Jacky is born, she moves to a home for unwed mothers and their infants. That’s where she hears that Jack has gone to Melbourne. When she finally tracks him down, he rejects her utterly and she finally understands that she was taken in by his ‘silver tongue.’ She and baby Jacky are turned away from six lodging places that night, and that’s when the tragedy happens.

A lot of people associate a ‘silver tongue’ with lawyers because they have to be as persuasive as they can in the courtroom. Their job is to make their case as effectively as possible, so the art of persuasion is important. I’ll bet you could come up with lots of examples of legal novels where the attorneys have to depend on that quality.

Whether it’s a sales rep, a con artist, an attorney or someone else, the ‘silver tongue’ can be a valuable asset when you want to have your way. Which examples of this have you enjoyed in crime fiction?



*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Deep Purple’s Lady Luck.


Filed under Agatha Christie, Anthony Bidulka, Carl Hiaasen, John Grant, Jonathan Gash, Louise Penny, Rex Stout, Teresa Solana, Wendy James