Category Archives: Christianna Brand

You Got a Different Point of View*

Many crime stories are told, for he most part, from the point of view of the sleuth. Sometimes they’re told from the point of one of a pair of sleuths (I’m thinking, for instance, of Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Homes stories). That makes sense, since the sleuth is often the story’s protagonist.

Sometimes, though, a story is told from the point of view of a different character. That can be tricky to do well, but when it does work, it can make for an interesting perspective. And, that different point of view can mean that readers get to see the sleuth through different eyes, as the saying goes.

Agatha Christie did that in several of her stories. For instance, Murder in Mesopotamia is the story of the murder of Louise Leidner, who accompanies her archaeologist husband, Eric, to a dig a few hours from Baghdad. Louise has reported strange noises, hands tapping on windows, and other odd occurrences, and her husband wants to ease her mind. So, he hires a nurse, Amy Leatheran, to stay at the expedition house and look after his wife’s needs. Not long afterwards, Louise is bludgeoned to death one afternoon in her room. Hercule Poirot is in the area and is persuaded to investigate. This story is told in first person (past tense) from Amy Leatheran’s point of view. That allows for a really interesting perspective on Poirot, as well as perspectives on the other people in the expedition house.

Christianna Brand’s Green For Danger is told mostly from the point of view of the suspects in the death of Joseph Higgins. Most of the action in the novel takes place at Heron Park Hospital, which has been converted for military use (WW II). One day, Higgins is brought there with a broken femur. It’s not life-threatening, but surgery will be required. Tragically, Higgins dies during the operation in an incident that’s put down to a terrible accident. Inspector Cockrill of the Kent police is sent in to do the requisite paperwork. It’s not long before he begins to suspect that Higgins might have been murdered. For one thing, that’s what Higgins’ widow claims. For another, one of the people who was present when Higgins died has too much to drink at a party, and then blurts out that she knows Higgins was murdered. That night, she, too, is killed. As Cockrill gets closer and closer to the truth about these deaths, we follow the thought processes of the suspects, and we see how they view Cockrill.

John Dickson Carr’s Hag’s Nook introduces readers to one of his sleuths, Dr. Gideon Fell. When Tad Rampole finishes his university studies in the US he decides to travel. His mentor suggests that he make plans to meet Fell, and Rampole agrees. On his way to Chatterham, where Fell lives, Rampole meets a young woman named Dorothy Starberth. He’s smitten right away and wants to know more about her. When he meets Fell, he learns some of the Starberth family story. It seems that, for two generations, Starberth men were governors in the nearby Chatterham Prison, which has fallen into disuse. From those years has come a tradition that every Starberth male spends the night of his twenty-fifth birthday in the old Governor’s Room at the prison. During his visit, each one is to open the safe in the room and follow the instructions that are written on a piece of paper kept in the safe. Now it’s the turn of Dorothy Starberth’s brother, Martin. Tragically, he dies from what looks like a fall from the balcony attached to the room. Although it seems like an accident at first, it turns out to have been murder. Fell solves the crime, but the story isn’t really told from his perspective. It’s told from Rampole’s perspective. It’s an interesting way to see Fell’s character from the outside, so to speak.

Alice LaPlante’s Turn of Mind is the story of Jennifer White, a Chicago orthopaedic surgeon who’s been diagnosed with dementia. She’s had to retire, and now lives with her caregiver, Magdalena. One night, seventy-five-year-old Amanda O’Toole is murdered. She lives next door to White, so, naturally, the police want to know if there’s any information White has. Detective Luton takes the case and wants to talk to White, but learning the truth won’t be easy. Since White has dementia, she may or may not be lucid, and she is very likely not going to be reliable. But Luton is convinced that she knows all about the murder and might even be guilty. So, she tries to find ways to get White to share her story. The novel is told from White’s point of view, so readers see Luton from that perspective. And, as the story goes on, and White’s condition deteriorates, her view of Luton changes, too.

And then there’s Donna Morrisey’s The Fortunate Brother, which features the members of the Now family. Sylvanus Now, his wife, Addie, and their son, Kyle, live in The Beaches, Newfoundland, where they’re still reeling from the death three years earlier of Kyle’s brother, Chris. His death was a tragic accident, not a murder, but that doesn’t make it any easier for the family, and they’re all suffering. Then, a local bully named Clar Gillard is killed. In one sense, there are plenty of suspects. He was mean and cruel, and no-one will miss him. But it’s not long before the police start to focus their attention on the Nows. And there’s evidence that could support any of the three of them being guilty. At the same time as they’re coping with being suspects in a murder investigation, they’re also facing a family health crisis. Having to deal with both of these crises at the same time draws the family together just a little. And, very slowly, they start to do a small bit of healing. Interestingly, we don’t ‘get into the heads’ of the police here. The story is told from the different perspectives of members of the Now family.

When a story is told from a different perspective like that, it can give readers a different view of the sleuth. It can also offer an interesting way to look at the experience of being involved in a criminal investigation. It’s not easy to write this sort of story well, but it can be effective.

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from the Pet Shop Boys’ A Different Point of View.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Alice LaPlante, Arthur Conan Doyle, Christianna Brand, Donna Morrissey, John Dickson Carr

Please Don’t Tell Me That I’m the Only One That’s Vulnerable*

Most people would rather not be killed. I know, that’s a painfully obvious point to make, but it has implications if you’re a fictional murderer. Among other things, it means that you have to pick your time. It’s easiest to commit the crime if the victim is already vulnerable, or at the very least, unsuspecting. For the author, that’s not always easy to pull off in a believable way, but there are plenty of examples of how this can work. Here are a few of them, to show you what I mean.

In Agatha Christie’s One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, we are introduced to powerful banker Alistair Blunt. He’s made more than his share of enemies, and he’s generally a careful person, partly for that reason. One day, he goes to see his dentist, Henry Morley, because of a toothache. Later, Morley is found shot in his surgery. And one real possibility is that the intended victim was Blunt himself. After all, people are quite vulnerable when they’re in the dentist’s chair. Chief Inspector Japp’s been told by his superiors to make this case a priority, since Blunt is considered important for national security. Then, there’s another death. A patient of Morley’s dies from a suspected overdose of drugs. When Japp finds out that Hercule Poirot was also at Morley’s office on the day of the murder, he contacts Poirot, and the two work together to find out the truth behind the two murders.

Christianna Brand’s Green For Danger takes place mostly at Heron Park Hospital, which has been converted for military (WWII) use. One day, a postman named Joseph Higgins is brought to the hospital with a broken femur. It’s considered a straightforward operation, and he’s brought in for surgery. Tragically, Higgins dies during the procedure. Inspector Cockrill of the Kent Police is brought in to ‘rubber-stamp’ the report of accidental death. Higgins’ wife, though, does not accept that explanation. She says that Higgins was murdered. Then, one of the hospital nurses has too much to drink at a party, and blurts out that she knows Higgins was murdered, and she knows how it was accomplished. Later that night, she, too, is killed. Now, Cockrill is sure this is a case of murder, and puts the focus of his search on the people who were present when Higgins died. It certainly shows how vulnerable people can be during surgery. Right, fans of Ngaio Marsh’s The Nursing Home Murder?

One plot thread of Ruth Rendell’s Simisola concerns the murder of Annette Bystock. She works at the local Employment Bureau, trying to match available jobs with unemployed people who can fill them. One day, she’s found murdered in her bed. Inspector Reg Wexford and his team begin to trace her last days, and discover that, shortly before she was murdered, she had an appointment with a young woman named Melanie Akande. Melanie has since gone missing, and Wexford and the team wonder whether the two incidents are related. And so they turn out to be, only not in the obvious way. It turns out that, on the day she died, Annette had stayed home from work because she was ill. Her vulnerability, and the fact that she was unsuspecting, made her easy prey for the killer.

In Zoran Drvenkar’s You, we are introduced to a character called the Traveler. His part of the story begins in 1995, during a terrible snowstorm that’s blocked the road between Bad Hersfeld and Eisenach. Many vehicles are stranded on the road, and even emergency vehicles can’t get through because of the snow. Everyone in that traffic mess is extremely vulnerable, and not just because of the snow and the cold. With everyone stuck, the Traveler has plenty of ready-made victims. He works his way along the line of cars, leaving twenty-six people dead by the time the road is cleared. He’s able to make his escape, and as the story goes on, we see what happens to him in the ensuing years.

And then there’s Max Kinning’s Baptism. In that novel, we meet George Wakeham, a London Underground driver. Early one morning, three hostage-takers break into his home, capturing his wife and children. Wakeham is told that his only chance of saving his family is to do exactly what their captors say. Then, they give him a mobile ‘phone and tell him to follow precisely the instructions they give him. This Wakeham agrees to do (what choice does he have?). He’s told to go to his job as usual, and take his place driving his usual train. What he doesn’t know at first is that the hostage-takers have boarded the train as well, and they have his family with them. Wakeham starts his route as usual, but before long, one of the hostage-takers joins him in the cab. He’s soon told to stop the train, and it’s only then that he sees what his enemies really wanted from him. The train is now stopped in an underground tunnel with over 400 very vulnerable people aboard. Word of the captured train gets out, and Detective Chief Inspector (DCI) Ed Mallory is assigned to contact the hostage-takers, find out what they want, and free the passengers. It’s not going to be easy, though, as this is a group of fanatics with a very specific purpose in mind. As Mallory tries to find out what he can, Wakeham tries to save his own life and those of his family members.

There are lots of other examples, too, of stories where the murderer (or would-be murderer) tries to choose a time when the victim will be especially vulnerable. It can add real tension to a story, and it makes sense. It’s easiest to target a victim who’s at a disadvantage.

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Secondhand Serenade’s Vulnerable.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Christianna Brand, Max Kinnings, Ngaio Marsh, Ruth Rendell, Zoran Drvenkar

I Had to Go Down to the Post Office*

As this is posted, it’s the birthday of the United States Post Office. Of course, there’ve been postal services for hundreds of years; and, even with today’s easy access to email and texts, the postal service is still important.

It certainly matters in crime fiction. I’m sure we could all think of crime novels where the plot hinges on a letter (or the absence of one). But it’s not just letters themselves.

For one thing, there’s the letter carrier. They can be interesting characters in and of themselves. There is, for instance, a G.K. Chesterton short story (no titles – I don’t want to give away too much) in which a postman figures strongly into the plot

And there’s Joseph Higgins, whom we meet in Christianna Brand’s Green For Danger. He’s a postman who, at the beginning of the novel, delivers a series of letters to different characters. The letters are all from Heron Park Hospital, which has been converted for wartime (WW II) military use. Each recipient is informed that she or he will be assigned there. Shortly after their work begins, Higgins is brought into the hospital with a broken femur. The operation he needs is routine, but it still involves surgery. Tragically, Higgins dies on the table in what’s put down to a terrible accident. His widow doesn’t think so, though, and says as much to Inspector Cockrill, who goes to the hospital to do the routine paperwork. Not long afterwards, one of the nurses who was present at the operation has too much to drink at a party and blurts out that she knows Higgins was murdered, and she knows how it was done. That night, she, too, is killed. Now, Cockrill has a major case on his hands, and it’s going to take finesse to find out which of the other characters is the killer.

Sometimes, the post office itself becomes a part of crime novel. That’s the case in Agatha Christie’s Mrs. McGinty’s Dead. James Bentley has been convicted, and is due to be executed soon, for the murder of his landlady. There’s evidence against him, and Superintendent Albert ‘Bert’ Spence should be satisfied with the outcome of the trial. It was he, after all, who gathered the evidence. But he’s begun to think that perhaps Bentley wasn’t guilty. And Spence doesn’t want to see a man die for a crime he didn’t commit. He asks Hercule Poirot to look into the case and see if there’s something that might have been missed, and Poirot agrees. He travels to the village of Broadhinny, where the murder occurred, and begins to get to know the residents. One of the gathering places in that village is the local shop, which also serves as the post office. When Poirot stops in to the shop, he meets its proprietor, Mrs. Sweetiman, who provides him with useful background information and a very important clue.

There’s a funny scene at a post office in Dorothy L. Sayers’ The Nine Tailors. Lord Peter Wimsey and his valet, Mervyn Bunter, are stranded in the East Anglia village of Fenchurch Saint Paul when Wimsey’s car gets into an accident. Vicar Theodore Venables rescues the two men, and lets them stay at the rectory until the car can be repaired. When the car is ready, Wimsey and Bunter leave, only to return a few months later when an unexpected corpse is found in a grave belonging to the local squire, Sir Henry Thorpe. At the vicar’s request, Wimsey looks into the matter. He and Bunter discover that there is a letter in the post office for the dead man, and they decide that it may provide clues. So, Bunter goes into the post office to try to get the letter if he can. Bunter invents a story for the postmistress to the effect that he’s looking for a letter sent to his chauffer, indicating Wimsey, who’s waiting outside in the car. Bunter soon returns to the car:

“What’s up?’
‘Better move on quickly, my lord,’ said Bunter, ‘because, while the manoeuvre has been attended with a measure of success, it is possible that I have robbed His Majesty’s Mails by obtaining a postal packet under false pretenses.’…
‘Bunter,’ said his lordship, ‘I warn you that I am growing dangerous. Will you say at once, yes or no, did you get that letter?’
‘Yes, my lord, I did. I said, of course, that since the letter for my chauffer was there, I would take it to him, adding some facetious observations to the effect that he must have made a conquest while we were travelling abroad and that he was a great man for the ladies. We were quite merry on the subject, my lord.’
‘Oh, where you?’
‘Yes, my lord. At the same time, I said, it was extremely vexatious that my own letter should have gone astray….and in the end I went away, after remarking that the postal system in this country was very undependable and that I should certainly write to the Times about it.”
 

Rita Mae Brown’s Mary Minor ‘Harry’ Haristeen lives in the tiny town of Crozet, Virginia. At the beginning of the series, she serves as the village’s postmistress, so she sees nearly everyone at least a few times a week. It’s the sort of place where people tend to come to the post office to pick up their mail, so it serves as a social gathering place as much as anything else. And that means that Harry knows everyone, and everyone knows her. It also means that she often gets to hear the local gossip. As ‘plugged in’ as Harry is, it’s not surprising that she gets involved when there’s a murder. And sometimes, the post itself provides clues (I’m thinking, for instance, of Wish You Were Here).

People use email, texts, online bill paying, and social media so often these days, that we may not think about how important post offices and delivery people really are. But they are. Especially when you’re waiting for that paper book you’ve ordered…

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from the Lucksmiths’ Don’t Come With Me.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Christianna Brand, Dorothy L. Sayers, G.K. Chesterton, Rita Mae Brown

Tired of Waiting For You*

I’ll bet you know the feeling. You’re at a job interview, a medical appointment, a bank, or perhaps even a mechanic. At some point, you’re asked to wait. That wait can seem endless, especially if you’re already feeling a little tense (you’re anxious about the job, or wondering what the medical news will be, or whether you’ll get that loan, or how much the car’s going to cost this time).

The tension people feel at those times is almost palpable, and in real life, it can be useful. People may not be as much on their guard, and that can be helpful for police detectives. It can also add a layer of suspense to a crime story. There’s an element of character depth, too that such suspense can add (how does a certain character behave under stress?).

In Agatha Christie’s Death in the Clouds (AKA Death in the Air), for instance, a group of passengers is on a flight from Paris to London. Towards the end of the flight, one of those passengers, Marie Morisot, is discovered dead of what turns out to be poison. The only possible suspects are the other passengers in that same cabin. So, the police, in the form of Chief Inspector Japp, ask those people to wait in a separate room until each can be interviewed. That scene is full of tension as the wait goes on. In this case, Japp doesn’t artificially extend the passengers’ wait, but it’s interesting to see how it impacts all of them. Hercule Poirot was on this flight, so he works with Japp to find out who the killer was.

Christianna Brand’s Green For Danger takes place mostly at Heron Park Hospital, which has been converted for wartime military use. One day, a postman named Jospeh Higgins is brought to the hospital with a broken femur. The operation to set the bone is risky, as all operations are; still, it’s considered straightforward. Tragically, though, Higgins dies during the surgery. Inspector Cockrill of the Kent Police is assigned to do the routine paperwork, but he soon comes to believe that this death was not an accident. Then, there’s another death, this time, an obvious murder. The only really viable suspects are the people who were involved in the original death. So, Cockrill keeps a close eye on them, more or less keeping them in the same place. And they’re soon shunned by other people at the hospital. The tension that goes with being suspected, and with being cooped up, adds much to the atmosphere of this novel.

In Colin Dexter’s The Jewel That Was Ours, Inspector Morse and Sergeant Lewis are called to the exclusive Randolph Hotel. Laura Stratton, an American tourist who was staying there, has died of an apparent heart attack, and a valuable jewel has been taken from her room. The missing piece is called the Wolvercote Tongue, and is part of a Saxon buckle that’s on display at the Ashmolean Museum. Before her death, the victim was going to donate that piece to the museum, so the fact that it’s missing is a real blow on several levels. The next day, Dr. Theodore Kemp, the museum’s curator, is found dead. It seems clear that the two incidents are related, so Morse and Lewis investigate them that way. And they start with Laura Stratton’s tour group. During the investigation, the tour group can’t move on to the rest of their stops, so there’s a bit of a claustrophobic feel as they wait for Morse and Lewis to unravel the truth. In the end, it’s all tied to a past tragedy.

Aditya Sudarshan’s A Nice Quiet Holiday begins as Judge Harish Shinde and his law clerk, Anant, travel to Bhairavgarh, in the Indian state of Rajasthan, for a two-week holiday. One of Shinde’s old friends, Shikhar Pant, has invited them for a visit, and it’s a good excuse to get out of the Delhi heat. Among the other guests at Pant’s home is his cousin, Kailish Pant, a well-known writer. There’s tension right away, mostly over the work being done by two other guests, Ronit and Kamini Mittal, who run an NGO. They’re trying to provide AIDS information and other reproductive health support to some of the rural areas, and many people see that as obscene. Others feel threatened for other reasons. And opinion among Pant’s guests is quite divided. Matters come to a head one afternoon when Kailish Pant is murdered. Inspector Patel is assigned to investigate, and he begins to talk to the house party. The judge and Anant work with Patel to find out who the killer is, and their job isn’t made any easier by the very tense atmosphere that’s created by that feeling of having to wait.

And that feeling of anxiety and suspense is there no matter how luxurious the atmosphere. For instance, in Swati Kaushal’s Drop Dead, we are introduced to Shimla Superintendent of Police Niki Marwah. She and her team are called to the ultra-luxurious Lotus Resort when the body of Rakesh ‘Rak’ Mehta is discovered in a valley not far from the resort. He was the CEO of Indigo Books India, and had brought his senior staff to the Lotus for a retreat. The case is soon identified as a ‘suspicious death,’ and Marwah and the team look more closely at the members of the victim’s staff. They learn that each of Mehta’s senior employees had a motive for murder, so until the investigation is complete, the staff will have to stay where they are. And that adds a solid layer of atmosphere and suspense, even in an elegant, extremely comfortable place like the Lotus.

There are plenty of other examples of this sort of tension. You see it as people wait for police interviews, in those ‘country house’ mysteries, and in other places, too. And it’s little wonder; anxious waiting really does add a layer of tension to a story.

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is the title of a song by the Kinks.

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Filed under Aditya Sudarshan, Agatha Christie, Christianna Brand, Colin Dexter, Swati Kaushal

We Gotta Get Out of This Place*

suspects-who-cannot-leaveI had a very interesting comment exchange with Tim, who blogs at The Short Story Reader’s Digest. Tim made the point – and it’s a good one – that there are crime novels that are, if you will, a sort of variation of the ‘locked room’ sort of story. Instead of the victim being in the locked room, the suspects are the ones who can’t leave until the mystery is solved.

As I thought about it, it occurred to me that there are stories like that. The suspects are all in one place, and they need to stay there, or the law requires they stay there, until the mystery is solved.

The story Tim and I were discussing is Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express. In that novel, a group of people are en route across Europe on the famous Orient Express train. On the second night of the journey, one of the passengers, Samuel Ratchett, is stabbed to death. Hercule Poirot is aboard the train, and he is prevailed upon to find out who the killer is before the train crosses the next frontier That way, the murderer can be handed over to the police. Poirot agrees, and begins by interviewing the passengers. Those interviews, plus some other clues and conversations, lead Poirot to the truth about the murder. As it happens, a terrible snowstorm has stopped the train. And, in any case, the train is nowhere near a station. This means that the passengers cannot leave, and the situation adds an interesting sense of claustrophobia to the story’s atmosphere.

There’s a similar sort of claustrophobia in Christianna Brand’s Green For Danger. Heron Park Hospital has been converted for (WWII) military use. Seven people – the seven major characters in the story – have received some sort of hospital assignment. One day, postman Joseph Higgins is brought to Heron Park with a broken femur. His leg will require an operation, but it’s not anticipated that it’ll be a terribly risky undertaking. Tragically, Higgins dies during the surgery. Inspector Cockrill of the Kent Police is sent to the hospital to prepare what he thinks will be a cursory report of this tragic, but accidental death. When he begins to ask questions, though, Cockrill starts to wonder whether Higgins’ death really was an accident. Then, one of the other characters, Sister Marion Bates, has too much to drink at a party, and blurts out that she knows Higgins was murdered. What’s more, she says she knows how it was done. Later that night, she, too, is killed. Now it seems clear that Higgins was murdered, and Cockrill looks into the matter more deeply. The only logical suspects are those who were in the room during the surgery, so those are the people Cockrill considers most carefully. And they slowly find themselves cut off from the rest of the hospital staff, and quite restricted in their movements. This adds a lot of tension to the story as Cockrill works to get to the truth.

Swati Kaushal’s Drop Dead introduces her sleuth, Shimla Superintendent of Police Niki Marwah. She and her team are called to the scene when the body of Rakesh ‘Rak’ Mehta is discovered in a valley not far from the ultra-luxurious Lotus Resort. At first, Mehta’s death looks like a terrible accident. But there are little clues that it might have been something else, and before long, it’s called a ‘suspicious death.’ This means that Marwah and her team now have to stay at the scene and investigate further. They soon learn that the victim was the CEO of Indigo Books, Ltd., and had brought his senior staff to the resort for a retreat. As details of that retreat come out, it becomes clear that several of Mehta’s colleagues had reasons for wanting him dead. He could be malicious, even cruel. And he was both arrogant and overbearing. It turns out, too, that several of those staff members are keeping secrets. The Lotus is extremely upmarket, and the staff members want for nothing. But none of them wants to stay there, even those who are innocent. Still, Marwah and her team have to insist that they not leave until the investigation is complete.

There’s also Marla Cooper’s Terror in Taffeta, in which San Francisco-based wedding planner Kelsey McKenna travels to the small Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende, to take charge of a destination wedding. Her clients, Nicole Abernethy and Nick Moreno, want a romantic wedding in a unique location, and San Miguel seems like the perfect spot. It doesn’t turn out that way, though. At the end of the wedding ceremony, one of the bridesmaids, Dana Poole, collapses and suddenly dies of what turns out to be poison. The police soon take charge, and it’s not long before they settle on the bride’s sister, Zoe, as the prime suspect. Zoe claims that she’s innocent, and asks Kelsey to help clear her name. And, in any case, Kelsey’s been hired to complete the job, and the bride’s mother insists that she ‘fix this problem.’ So, Kelsey starts to ask questions. It only adds to the tension that the bridal party cannot leave San Miguel during the investigation, especially since Zoe really could be innocent. After all, if she is not guilty, then someone else at the wedding is. In this case, it isn’t so much the police who require that everyone remain (they’re willing to let people leave once they’ve arrested Zoe). Rather, it’s the sense of not leaving Zoe alone that keeps everyone there. But not everyone is happy about it…

There’s a different sort of twist on this plot point in Peter James’ Not Dead Yet. One plot thread of that novel concerns superstar entertainer Gaia Lafayette. Originally from Brighton, she moved to the US, but is returning to her home town to star in an on-location historical film. There’s already been one attempt on her life, and of course, the local reputation will not be served if anything happens to her during her visit. So, Brighton and Hove Superintendent Roy Grace has been assigned to ensure her safety. His department is not exactly overstaffed, but he’s told to do what it takes to keep her safe. One measure the team decides on is to ask Gaia and her entourage to remain in the hotel unless they are actually filming. It’s very difficult, especially for Gaia’s son. But that’s the best way to protect her. Then, there’s a death. Now, the film team has to stay in Brighton until matters are cleared up. It’s difficult for them all, especially those who stand to lose money if they don’t return to Hollywood. And it adds tension to the novel.

And that’s the thing about that plot point. When characters involved in a murder have to stay in one place until the mystery is solved, this adds a great deal of tension and suspense to a story. Thanks, Tim, for the inspiration. Folks do check out Tim’s interesting discussion of short stories on his blog!

 

 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is the title of a song by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Christianna Brand, Marla Cooper, Peter James, Swati Kaushal