Category Archives: Karin Fossum

We Were Just Young and Restless and Bored*

Have you ever gotten so busy that you almost wish you could be bored? You might even think what a luxury it is to have enough time for boredom. But, before you get too envious of those who are bored, keep in mind that it has its own challenges.

If you look at crime fiction, you see all sorts of negative consequences that come from being bored. Boredom, especially among young people, can get one into serious trouble. Here are just a few examples to show you what I mean. I know you’ll think of lots more than I could.

In Karin Fossum’s When the Devil Holds the Candle, we are introduced to two young men, Andreas Winthur and Sivert ‘Zipp’ Skorpe. They are best friends; in fact, you could say that they’re each other’s only real friend. They are also bored with life, and without much purpose. Their search for something to do gets them into trouble more than once. And, on one fateful day, it has terrible consequences. Andreas and Zipp spend the day together. Later, Andreas disappears. His mother, Runi, is worried about him, so she goes to the police. At first, Inspector Konrad Sejer isn’t overly concerned. After all, Andreas isn’t a young child. But when more time goes by, and he hasn’t returned, Sejer and his assistant, Jacob Skarre, start investigating. Naturally, one of their first interviewees is Zipp. But he’s not much help. Zipp says he and Andreas parted company before Andreas disappeared. Sejer is sure that Zipp knows more than he’s telling, but it’s not going to be easy to find out the truth.

Wendy James’ The Lost Girls is the story of fourteen-year-old Angela Buchanan. In 1978, she gets permission to spend some of the summer at the home of her Aunt Barbara and Uncle Doug Griffin, near Sydney. Angela, her cousin, Mick, and Mick’s friends, are a little bored, with no school, no sport contests, and so on. So, they spend a lot of time playing pinball at a local drugstore. One day, the group goes to the drugstore as usual, but Angela doesn’t come back. She is later found dead, with a scarf over her head. The police investigate, and they focus their attention on Mick and his friends, but they can’t find any evidence of wrongdoing. Then, a few months later, another young girl is found dead, again with a scarf around her head. The theory now is that someone is targeting young girls, and people do worry. The press even dubs the killer, the ‘Sydney Strangler.’ No more killings are reported, though, and the murders are never solved. Years later, filmmaker Erin Fury decides to do a documentary on families who’ve lost a loved one to murder, and she approaches the Griffin family. They eventually agree to be interviewed, and we slowly learn what really happened to Angela.

In Pascal Garnier’s How’s the Pain?, we meet twenty-one-year-old Bernard Ferrand. There’s not much for him in the small town in which he lives, and he’s bored and restless. Then, he meets professional assassin Simon Marechall. And it turns out that he’s got something Marechall needs: a driver license. Marechall needs a driver to take him to Cap d’Agde, on the French coast, where he wants to do one more job before he retires. Bernard isn’t doing anything else with his life, and he is bored. So, he agrees to serve as driver, and the two plan their trip. But Bernard doesn’t know what his new boss does for a living. By the time he finds out, it’s too late, and things start to spin out of control.

Of course, it’s not just young people who get bored with their lives. In Ian Rankin’s Doors Open, for example, wealthy Mike Mackenzie has gotten bored with his life, and he’s looking for some excitement. He and his banker friend, Allan Cruikshank, share a love of art. So, together with art professor Gissing, and with help from local gangster Chib Calloway, Mackenzie and Cruikshank devise a plot. They want to rob the National Gallery of Scotland, and replace some of its valuable holdings with forged art. They choose the gallery’s Doors Open day, when the public gets to view the warehouses and other ‘behind the scenes’ places associated with the museum. The robbery goes off as planned, but the group soon learns that there’s more to benefiting from art then just stealing it…

Sometimes, of course, boredom has more positive consequences. For example, in Agatha Christie’s Hickory Dickory Dock, Poirot’s frighteningly efficient secretary, Miss Lemon, brings him an unusual problem. Her sister, Mrs. Hubbard, manages a hostel for students where some perplexing things have been happening. Odd things have been disappearing, and there seems no explanation for what’s going on. Here are Poirot’s thoughts on the matter:
 

‘Hercule Poirot was silent for a minute and a half.
Did he wish to embroil himself in the troubles of Miss Lemon’s sister and the passions and grievances of a polyglot Hostel? …
He did not admit to himself that he had been rather bored of late and that the very triviality of the business attracted him.’
 

Poirot agrees to look into the case, and it turns out that this is much more serious than someone stealing things for fun.

As you can see, boredom has all sorts of consequences. Some of them can be positive, as boredom can spur us on to find new ways to be productive. But other times, boredom can lead to disastrous consequences. There are all sorts of examples in crime fiction; which ones have stayed with you?

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Bob Seger’s Night Moves.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Ian Rankin, Karin Fossum, Wendy James, Pascal Garnier

Driving Me to the Airport and to the Friendly Skies*

Modern security has changed a lot about airport experiences. But, if you think about it, they’re still places where hundreds of thousands of people pass through. If you bring all of these disparate people together, any number of things can happen. And they do. I’m sure you have your own stories that could start this way: ‘I was at the airport, when…’ Airports are like that.

It’s little wonder, then, that airports figure so often into crime fiction. For one thing, plenty of people use them; an airport experience is a real-life sort of thing. For another, there are many possibilities for interactions, conflict, suspense, and more.

Agatha Christie’s Passenger to Frankfort, for instance, begins as Stafford Nye, a low-level British diplomat, is waiting in an airport. A young woman approaches him and tells him that her life is in danger, and that she needs to flee the country. At first, Nye refuses to help her, but she persists. Finally, he relents and allows her to use his passport and diplomatic credentials (I know – that would never happen in today’s airline travel). Before long, that chance encounter (or was it really by chance?) draws Nye into a web of international intrigue and murder. Behind it all is a shadowy group bent on world domination. This one isn’t, perhaps, one of Christie’s best. But the airport scene shows that you never can tell what will happen in an airport.

Scott Young’s Murder in Cold Climate features Matthew ‘Matteesie’ Kitologitak of the RCMP. As the novel opens, he’s at the airport in Inuvik, on the first leg of a trip to his home in Ottawa. His plan then is to travel to an international conference. Instead, he gets a call from his boss, who wants him to look into the disappearance of a Cessna that was carrying three men. Matteesie agrees to see what he can find out, and gets on board his flight, which is heading to Edmonton. On the same flight is a Native Activist named Morton Cavendish. When the plane stops at the Fort Norman airport, a gunman forces his way onto the plane and shoots Cavendish. Matteesie was a witness to the murder, and in any case, he knew Cavendish. So, he wants to find out who the killer is. And it turns out that this murder may very well be related to the missing Cessna case that Matteesie’s already investigating.

In Karin Fossum’s Calling Out For You (AKA The Indian Bride), we are introduced to Gundar Jormann. He’s lived a very quiet life in the Norwegian village of Elvestad. There, he has the reputation of being a steady worker and a good man, if not exactly brilliant or scintillating. When Jormann decides he wants to get married, people are surprised, although, as he sees it, he’s not a proverbial bad catch. But when he decides to go to Mumbai to find his bride, everyone’s shocked. He goes ahead with his plans, though, and makes the trip. There, he meets Poona Bai, and it’s not long before he is smitten with her. After a short time, he proposes to her, and she accepts. But she needs some time to manage the details of leaving India and getting to Norway. So, the plan is for Jormann to go back to Elvestad and meet his bride at the airport when she arrives. His plans have to change, though, when his sister, Marie, is involved in a car accident. Since he can’t leave Marie’s side, he asks a friend to meet Poona at the airport. His friend duly travels to the airport and waits for Poona. But the two miss each other. If you think about it, that’s not an impossible scenario, since they don’t know each other, and since airports can be busy, crowded place. The next morning, Poona’s body is found in a field not far from Jormann’s home. Oslo police inspector Konrad Sejer and his assistant, Jacob Skarre, investigate the murder. They find that several people in Elvestad aren’t telling everything they know.

Anthony Bidulka’s Aloha Candy Hearts begins as Saskatoon PI Russell Quant visits Hawai’i. He’s there to spend time with his partner, Alex Canyon, who’s based in Melbourne. When the visit’s over, Quant goes to the airport to return to Saskatoon. While he’s there, he meets an enigmatic stranger named Walter Angel, who turns out to be an archivist. Angel slips a cryptic message, much like a treasure map, into Quant’s hand luggage; shortly afterwards, he is murdered. Quant uses the message he was giving to try to find out who would have wanted to kill the victim. It turns out that this death is related to some secrets that are based back home in Saskatoon.

In T.J. Cooke’s Kiss and Tell, London attorney Jill Shadow gets a call from a custody sergeant at Heathrow Airport. It seems that a young woman named Bella Kiss has been caught carrying drugs into the country. She insists on talking to Shadow. Although Shadow’s never met the woman before (even the name is unfamiliar), she goes along to the airport. When she meets Bella, she hears a little of the story. Bella admits to bringing drugs into the country, but she won’t say who paid or coerced her. It’s obvious that she fears for her life, and she wants Shadow to help her. At the same time, she’s uncooperative. So, Shadow has to find out the answers for herself. And they lead to some dangerous high places.

See what I mean? Airports are busy places where a lot happens at once, and where thousands of people are at the same place at the same time. Anything can happen there, so it’s little wonder they’re present in crime fiction.

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Crosby, Stills, & Nash’s Just a Song Before I Go.  

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Anthony Bidulka, Karin Fossum, Scott Young, T.J. Cooke

I Hope You’re Enjoyin’ the Scenery*

Have you ever visited a place (even locally to you) just for the scenery? Or taken a longer (but more scenic) route to get somewhere? There are many places with breathtaking scenery, so it’s not surprising that people visit them, spend holidays in those places, and so on.

Scenery can be a good reason for a real-life trip (or ‘road stop’). But in crime fiction, it doesn’t always work out well. Just because the scenery is interesting (or even gorgeous) doesn’t mean a place is safe…

For example, in Agatha Christie’s The Mystery of the Blue Train, we are introduced to Katherine Grey. She’s spent the last ten years in the village of St. Mary Mead, serving as a paid companion. When her employer dies, Katherine is shocked to learn that she’s inherited a fortune. One thing Katherine wants to do with her new-found wealth is to travel. She wants a change of scenery, at least for a while, so she decides to accept a distant relative’s invitation and go to Nice. Part of her journey takes her on the famous Blue Train, where she meets Ruth Van Aldin Kettering. The two strike up a conversation, which turns out to be one of the last interactions Ruth has. She’s found strangled the next day, and the police are called in. Katherine isn’t really a suspect, but she is a ‘person of interest,’ so she gets involved in the murder investigation. Hercule Poirot is on the same train, and he works with the police to find out who the killer is. Nice doesn’t turn out to be the restful, lovely trip it might seem on the surface…

In Dorothy L. Sayer’s Have His Carcase, mystery novelist Harriet Vane decides to take in some scenery on a hiking holiday. At first, she enjoys the trip. The scenery is beautiful, and it’s good to get away for a break. Everything changes one afternoon when she stops near the town of Wilvercombe. It’s been a tiring morning, so she decides to take a rest by the beach. When she wakes, she discovers a dead man. She alerts the authorities, and an investigation begins. It turns out that the dead man is Paul Alexis, a Russian-born professional dancer who works at a local hotel. With help from Lord Peter Wimsey, Harriet discovers the truth about the victim, and finds the murderer.

Charlotte Jay’s A Hank of Hair begins when publisher/bookseller Gilbert Hand decides to take the advice of his doctor and move to London, so he can get a change of scenery. He’s still coping with the death of his beloved wife, Rachel, and it’s hoped that the move will help. Hand takes a room in a very respectable hotel, and settles in. One day, he opens the davenport in the room he’s been given, and discovers a silk scarf in which is wrapped a coil of long, dark hair. Curious about whose hair it might be, and how it got there, Hand begins to ask some questions. He learns that the man who had his room previously is named Freddie Doyle, and sets about to learn who Doyle is. He becomes even more curious when Doyle shows up at the hotel, asking for the ‘package.’ Little by little, Hand becomes obsessed with Doyle, and begins to see them as opponents in a sort of chess game. Before long, things spin out of control, and the result is tragedy.

Things turn tragic in Karin Fossum’s Bad Intentions, too. Three young men, Jon Moreno, Axel Frimann, and Philip Reilly, decide to spend a weekend at a cabin by Dead Water Lake. The scenery is lovely, and it’s hoped that a break will do them all good. They’re especially concerned about Jon, who’s recently been released from a mental institution, and is still quite fragile. At first, all goes well. But one night, the three men go out on the lake and a tragedy occurs. Only two come back. Oslo police detective Konrad Sejer and his assistant, Jacob Skarre, investigate. In the meantime, another body is recovered, this time from Glitter Lake. So, the detectives also have to determine whether the two incidents are related. Very slowly, they piece together what happened. In this case, the cabin by the lake doesn’t turn out to be peaceful at all…

And then there’s Virginia Duigan’s The Precipice. In it, former school principal Thea Farmer buys some property in New South Wales’ Blue Mountains. Partly, she wants to live away from a lot of people. She also loves the scenery. So, she has the perfect home custom-built. Then, bad luck and poor financial decision-making leave her with no choice but to sell the house she’s bought, and settle for the one next door – a house she refers to as ‘the hovel.’ As if that’s not bad enough, Frank Campbell and Ellice Carrington buy the home that Thea still thinks of as hers. Now, she has to put up with people nearby, and in ‘her’ house!  Then, Frank’s niece Kim moves in with him and Ellice. At first, Thea thinks that will make things only worse. But to her surprise, she finds herself forming a kind of awkward friendship with the girl. And that’s one reason she gets so upset when she begins to believe that Frank isn’t providing an appropriate environment for Kim. Thea tries to tell the police, but there’s nothing they can do. So, she makes her own plans. The Blue Mountains may be breathtaking, but that doesn’t mean they’re peaceful and friendly…

And that’s the thing about scenery. No matter how gorgeous it is, you never know what might lurk. So be careful if you go out for a ‘Sunday drive.’

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Jimmy Buffett’s Come Monday.  

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Charlotte Jay, Dorothy L. Sayers, Karin Fossum, Virginia Duigan

Down to Elvis Presley Boulevard Where All the Faithful Cried*

As this is posted, it’s 40 years since the death of Elvis Presley. Whatever you think of his music, Presley was a worldwide phenomenon, and millions of people still make the pilgrimage to his home at Graceland. Oh, and by the way, you’ll want to check out Riley Adams’ (AKA Elizabeth Spann Craig) Memphis Barbecue series, which takes place in Memphis, and which has plenty of mentions of (and even a big event at) Graceland.

Presley’s passing left his legions of fans grief-stricken. There are even those who swear that he’s still alive; that’s how much he meant to them. But it’s often that way when someone you’ve put on a pedestal dies. If it’s a famous person, there’s a wide outpouring of emotion. If it’s someone you’ve personally had as an idol (say, a colleague or friend or mentor), the grief may not be as public, but it’s no less there. Certainly, that’s true in real life, and it is in crime fiction, too.

For instance, in Agatha Christie’s The Hollow, we are introduced to Harley Street specialist Dr. John Christow. He and his wife, Gerda, are among a group of people invited to spend a weekend at the home of Sir Henry and Lady Lucy Angkatell. On the Sunday afternoon, Christow is shot by the swimming pool. Hercule Poirot, who’s in the area and has been invited for lunch, arrives just after the shooting; in fact, at first, he thinks it’s an ‘amusement’ staged for his benefit. Very soon, though, he sees that it’s all too real. Poirot works with Inspector Grange to find out who the murderer is. As he does, we see just how many people put Christow on a pedestal. And even for those who didn’t do that, we see clearly that his death has left a gaping hole, if I can put it like that.

In Karin Fossum’s When the Devil Holds the Candle, Oslo police detective Konrad Sejer and his assistant Jacob Skarre investigate when eighteen-year-old Andreas Winther disappears. When Andreas’ mother, Runi, first reports him missing, Sejer isn’t overly concerned. There are, after all, plenty of reasons why a young man might take off for a few days without telling his mother where he’s going. But when more time goes by, and he doesn’t return, Sejer begins to look more seriously into the matter. He begins with Andreas’ best friend, Sivert ‘Zipp’ Skorpe. I can say without spoiling the story that Zipp didn’t kill his friend. But he does know a lot more than he’s saying about their last day together, and about what might have happened to Andreas. And, as the story goes on, we see that, in a way, Zipp hero-worshipped his friend, and is dealing with his own kind of grief and sense of loss.

Åsa Larsson’s The Savage Altar (AKA Sun Storm) is the story of the murder of Viktor Stråndgard. His body is discovered in a Kiruna church called the Church of the Source of All Our Strength. The victim was an up-and-coming church leader who was sometimes called The Paradise Boy. He had many, many followers, so his death makes national news. In fact, that’s how Stockholm tax attorney Rebecka Martinsson hears about the murder. It’s especially shocking to her because she grew up in Kiruna, and knew the Stråndgard family. Then, she gets a call from the victim’s sister, Sanna, a former friend. Sanna says that the police suspect her of the murder, and she needs Martinsson’s help. At first, Martinsson refuses; she had her own good reasons for leaving Kiruna in the first place, and has no desire to return. But Sanna finally persuades her to go. Martinsson hasn’t been there long when Sanna is actually arrested for the murder and imprisoned. Now, if she’s to clear her former friend’s name, Martinsson will have to find out who the real killer is. As she looks into the case, we see how Viktor Stråndgard’s death has impacted the church, his followers, and plenty of other people as well.

Qiu Xiaolong’s Death of a Red Heroine is the first in his series featuring Shanghai police detective Chief Inspector Chen Cao. One morning, the body of a woman is pulled from a canal not far from Shanghai. Very soon, she is identified as Guan Hongying, a national model worker. That means this investigation is going to have to be done very delicately. The victim was somewhat of a celebrity, and her death has been reported widely, leaving many people upset. What’s more, she had high political status, and moved in circles with some important people. So, it’s going to be critical that the case be handled as carefully as possible.

A similar thing might be said of William Ryan’s The Darkening Field (AKA The Bloody Meadow), which takes place in the then-USSR in the years just before World War II. It’s the story of the murder of Maria Alexandrovna Lenskaya, a dedicated Party worker and up-and-coming actress. When she’s found dead at a filming location, it looks at first as though it might be a suicide. But there are enough questions about it that Moscow CID Captain Alexei Korolev is seconded to Odessa to find out the truth. And that’s going to be a problem. If the victim died by suicide that’ll be put down as a tragedy, but no more. If it’s a murder, though, the matter could turn very ugly for some important people. And, since the victim was a celebrity, albeit a minor one, there’ll be news reports, and word will get out. So, Korolev will have to tread very, very lightly as he investigates.

And then there’s Wendy James’ The Lost Girls. The real action in this novel begins in 1978, when fourteen-year-old Angela Buchanan goes missing and is later found dead, with a scarf round her head. At the time, the police concentrate heavily on her family, especially her aunt, uncle and cousins, with whom she’s staying during the summer. Then, a few months later, another girl, sixteen-year-old Kelly McIvor is killed. She, too, is found with a scarf. Now, the Sydney police seem to be dealing with a mass killer that the press has dubbed the Sydney Strangler. No-one is ever arrested for the crimes, though, and the cases go cold. Years later, journalist Erin Fury wants to do a documentary on the families of murder victims. She approaches Angela’s cousin Jane Tait, who gives very reluctant permission to be interviewed. She also interviews Jane’s brother, Mick, and their parents, Barbara and Doug Griffin. As the story goes on, we learn the story of that summer, and we learn what really happened to both Angela and Kelly. Admittedly, Angela is not a film or music idol. But Jane put her up on a pedestal, in a way, and her loss struck a devastating blow from which the family still hasn’t really recovered. It’s an interesting case of a person who isn’t famous, but who is still someone’s idol.

The loss of an idol can have a profound impact on a person. And that can make for an interesting crime plot or layer of character development. Which examples have stayed with you?

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is a line from Billy Joel’s Elvis Presley Boulevard.  

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Åsa Larsson, Elzabeth Spann Craig, Karin Fossum, Qiu Xiaolong, Riley Adams, Wendy James, William Ryan

You’re My Best Friend*

best-friendsWhen a person goes missing or is murdered, the police often talk to that person’s best friend(s) to get information. After all, we often tell things to our best friends that we don’t tell anyone else, even our families. So, it’s almost always worth the time it takes to find out who that best friend is and talk to him or her.

In crime fiction, a victim’s best friend can provide plenty of important clues, if that’s what the author wishes to do. And, since friendships – even best friendships – can be very complicated, there are all sorts of possibilities for plot twists. So, it’s little wonder we see fictional sleuths paying all sorts of attention to best friends. There are far too many examples for me to mention here. I hope you’ll add your own, to complete this post.

Agatha Christie introduced one of her most famous sleuths, Hercule Poirot, in The Mysterious Affair at Styles. In that novel, Poirot has recently emigrated to England, and is now living in the village of Styles St. Mary, not far from his benefactor, Emily Inglethorp, who lives at Styles Court. As it happens, Captain Arthur Hastings is a friend of her stepson, John Cavendish. He’s visiting Cavendish when Emily Inglethorp is poisoned. By chance, he meets up with Poirot, whom he also knows, and persuades the detective to investigate. One of the people Poirot talks to is the victim’s best friend and companion, Evelyn ‘Evie’ Howard. And Miss Howard certainly has plenty to say against her friend’s husband, Alfred Inglethorp. It’s an interesting perspective on the victim, and it turns out to be useful in solving the case. I know, fans of Death on the Nile.

In Karin Fossum’s When the Devil Holds the Candle, Oslo police detective Konrad Sejer and his assistant, Jacob Skarre, investigate the disappearance of Andreas Winthur. It seems that he spent the day with his best friend, Sivert ‘Zipp’ Skorpe, and never came home. When his mother, Runi, gets worried about him, she goes to the police. At first, Sejer doesn’t worry too much, since Andreas is not a little child. But after some time goes by, he, too, gets concerned. That’s when he and Skarre start to look into the matter. They soon find out about Zipp, and Sejer has more than one interview with him. It’s not spoiling the story to say that Zipp didn’t kill his friend. But he knows more than he is saying, and it takes Sejer quite a while to get that information. Among other things, this novel offers an interesting perspective on young adult friendships. Fossum also explores this in other novels, such as Black Seconds and Bad Intentions.

Peter James’ Dead Simple introduces readers to Superintendent Roy Grace of the Brighton and Hove police. In the novel, groom-to-be Michael Harrison disappears a few days before his wedding. It all started innocently enough with a ‘stag night’ prank. But a terrible car accident left Harrison stranded and in real danger. His fiancée, Ashley Harper, goes to the police for help, and DI Glenn Branson agrees to investigate. He brings Grace along, and soon enough, there’s an all-out search. As a part of the investigation, the police talk to Harrison’s best friend and best-man-to-be, Mark Warren. Warren wasn’t in town at the time of Harrison’s disappearance, so he doesn’t know exactly what happened. But he does have background and other useful information, which turns out to be important to the case.

Constable Paul ‘Hirsch’ Hirschhausen is faced with a tragic case in Garry Disher’s Bitter Wash Road. He’s recently been stationed at Tiverton, in rural South Australia, and is adjusting to life there. One day, the body of fifteen-year-old Melia Donovan is discovered by the side of Bitter Wash Road. There are definite signs that the victim wasn’t killed there, so there are plenty of possibilities. This won’t be an easy case. It’s made even harder by the fact that Hirsch is a pariah among his fellow coppers, because he’s seen as a ‘whistleblower.’ So, he’s going to get no help with the Melia Donovan case. As you’d guess, Hirsch starts with the victim’s family and friends. That includes her best friend, Gemma Pitcher, who works at a local convenience shop. At first, she does her best to avoid talking to him. But eventually he catches up with her, and the information she finally provides turns out to be helpful.

The focus of Ivy Pochoda’s Visitation Street is the disappearance of June Giatto. One summer night, she and her best friend, Valerie ‘Val’ Marino decide to take a raft ride on the bay near their Brooklyn area of Red Hook. The next morning, Val is found, injured but alive. June, though, has disappeared. Despite a major search, there’s no sign of her – not even a body. The police, of course, have plenty of questions for Val, but she claims not to know what happened to her friend. In fact, she’s devastated by June’s loss, and upset by the insinuations that she might know more about it than she’s saying. As time goes by, we slowly learn what happened to June, and we get an ‘inside look’ at the friendship between the two girls.

And then there’s John Hart’s The Last Child. Thirteen-year-old Johnny Merrimon has been devastated ever since the disappearance of his twin, Alyssa, a year earlier. He’s determined to find her, or at least, find out what happened to her. And he’s got a map and a plan. One day, he’s skipping school, spending time by the local river, when he witnesses another death. The victim this time is David Wilson, a local college professor. And he just might have had some information about Alyssa. Local police detective Clyde Hunt knows the Merrimon case well; he investigated it. And it’s haunted him ever since that he wasn’t able to get answers. So, he stays in contact with the family, and tries to help Johnny in his own way. One of the people Hunt talks to is Johnny’s best friend, Jack Cross. As the story evolves, we learn more about their friendship, the role it plays in Johnny’s life, and Jack’s perspective on Johnny. And that information turns out to be important.

Best friends can be the most loyal and helpful people in one’s life. Or the most dangerous. And that’s part of what makes those characters so interesting in crime fiction. Right, fans of Megan Abbott’s The End of Everything?

 
 
 

*NOTE: The title of this post is the title of a song by Queen.

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Filed under Agatha Christie, Garry Disher, Ivy Pochoda, John Hart, Karin Fossum, Megan Abbott, Peter James